Adenoiditis and the Adenoidectomy
Adenoiditis and the Adenoidectomy

As president of Port Huron Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) in Michigan, Dr. Frank Brettschneider addresses a comprehensive range of otolaryngological conditions. Dr. Frank Brettschneider and his team have performed a number of adenoidectomy procedures on patients with enlarged adenoids.

Located at the back of the throat, the adenoids catch bacteria and viruses that pass through the airways. Adenoids are invisible to the outside eye yet serve a critical role in supporting the body's immune system in the developing years. 

Because adenoids are most prominent in childhood, it is during that time that they most often become infected and inflamed. Inflammation of the adenoids, or adenoiditis, can cause a range of symptoms, including a sore throat, ear pain, and nasal congestion. 

Adenoiditis often responds to antibiotics, but in some children, the inflammation recurs multiple times. For these patients, the ENT specialist may recommend an adenoidectomy, or removal of the adenoids.

An adenoidectomy takes place under general anesthesia, though the surgery does not require any incisions into the skin. Instead, the surgeon enters the throat through the mouth and cuts away the inflamed adenoid tissue. 

Most patients can go home the same day but require several days of rest and soft foods while the surgical site recovers. Prescription medication may help control discomfort.
Adenoiditis and the Adenoidectomy
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Adenoiditis and the Adenoidectomy

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