7 of 70 Words | British Council
In 2018, British Council India celebrated it's 70th Anniversary with #InspiredByIndia, roping us in to illustrate 7 of 70 words that made their way from 
India to the English lexicon.
Jodhpurs / jodpores (earlier as jodhpur riding-breeches, 1899), from Jodhpur, former state in northwestern India. Founded 1459 by Rao Jodha, a local ruler, and is named for him.
'Cheetah'; derived from cītā (Hindi: चीता), which in turn comes from the Sanskrit word citrakāyaḥ (चित्रकायः) meaning "bright" or "variegated".
The word "chutney" is derived from the Hindi word चटनी chaṭnī, meaning to lick. In India, "chutney" refers to fresh and pickled preparations indiscriminately.
'Jackal'; from Turkish çakal, from Persian شغال shaghal, from Middle Indic shagal, ultimately from Sanskrit शृगालः srgalah "the howler".
From Portuguese palanquim, ultimately from Sanskrit पल्यङ्क (palyaṅka, “bed, couch, bedstead”)
Early 17th century: from Tamil paṛaiyar, plural of paṛaiyan ‘(hereditary) drummer’, from paṛai ‘a drum'.
'Tiffin', in the British Raj, was used to define the British custom of afternoon tea that had been supplanted by the Indian practice of having a light meal at that hour. A word that appears to have originated in the English colloquial or slang tiffing, a verbal noun 'to take a little drink or sip', has been specialized in Anglo-Indian use.
7 of 70 Words | British Council
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7 of 70 Words | British Council

In 2018, British Council India celebrated it's 70th Anniversary with #InspiredByIndia, roping us in to illustrate 7 of 70 words that made their w Read More
44
484
4
Published:

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