Add to Collection
About

About

The purpose of this reconstruction is to investigate the relationship of the Triclinium, the famous dining room at the villa of the Mysteries in … Read More
The purpose of this reconstruction is to investigate the relationship of the Triclinium, the famous dining room at the villa of the Mysteries in Pompeii, Italy to its setting within its gardens and its extensive views. The room itself is still relatively intact but is now shut off from exterior light in order to preserve the wonderful murals inside. The series of reconstructed views try to give some notion of its opening into the landscape and its natural and evening lighting. Read Less
Published:
Villa of the Mysteries, Pompeii
Computer reconstruction
The purpose of this reconstruction is to investigate the relationship of the Triclinium, the famous dining room at the villa of the Mysteries in Pompeii, Italy, to its setting within its gardens and its extensive views.The room itself is still relatively intact but is now shut off from exterior light in order to preserve the wonderful murals inside.The series of reconstructed views try to give some notion of its opening into the landscape and its dayight and evening lighting.
View into the triclinium from the vestibule—night time  view is below
Shown above is the current state of the Triclinium. The floor is original and the state of the original murals is quite good except for the areas seen at the end and right side of the room.
 
View of the reconstructed triclinium, the dining room of the villa
The triclinium looking towards the room entrance. This view attempts to show the context of the room in its natural lighting and its relationship to the adjacent garden on the left and the distant sea view through the entry door.
The triclinium at night would have taken on a very different feeling from the room with its day time openness and with its relationship to the surrounding gardens and views.With the shutters closed and the room lit by oil lamps or candles on candelabra the sense of intimacy and mystery would have been heightened.
 
View towards the triclinium entrance
View of the north wall.
View of the north east corner of the room at night
View of the south wall and the south wall at night below.
 
VILLA OF THE MYSTERIES—CREDITS:

Acknowledgements and thanks to:

PIETRO GIOVANNI GUZZO, Archaeological Superintendent of Pompeii, for his generous permission to photograph the Villa of the Mysteries.

ELAINE GAZDA, professor of classical art and archaeology in the Department of the History of Art at the University of Michigan and curator of Hellenistic and Roman Antiquities at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. for her expertise and help in reconstructing the Villa.

BETTINA BERGMANN, Helene Phillips Herzig '49 Professor of Art Specialization: Greek and Roman art; the art of landscape, also for her insight and help in the process.

ROGER ULRICH, for his invaluable work on Roman construction techniques published as Roman Woodworking by Yale University Press.

All photos and reconstructions are copyright of JAMES STANTON-ABBOTT.