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Charles Jeffcoat is a designer, a visual communicator, and a professor of visual communication.

Charles Jeffcoat earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in graphic design from The University Of South Alabama in 1994. After working in the field of advertising and design for several years he was asked to take an adjunct pos… Read More
Charles Jeffcoat is a designer, a visual communicator, and a professor of visual communication.

Charles Jeffcoat earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in graphic design from The University Of South Alabama in 1994. After working in the field of advertising and design for several years he was asked to take an adjunct position in design at The University Of South Alabama where he taught for two years. From there, Charles moved to earn his Master of Fine Arts in graphic design from The University Of Memphis in 2005, where he also taught in an adjunct position. Currently Charles is an Assistant Professor of Visual Communications at Francis Marion University in Florence, South Carolina. His classes have included Interactive Communication I and II, Typography I and II, History of Graphic Design, and several others.

Throughout his career Charles has maintained a professional freelance design business through his own company. His clients included The National Civil Rights Museum, Art Museum of the University of Memphis, Movie Gallery, Sony Music, Universal Records, and Warner Music. He has also donated his time and design work to several charitable organizations including St Jude Children's Research Hospital, and the National Civil Rights Museum.

Besides his applied professional design practice, Charles’ current research is in the area of the cross-mediation of hypertextual environments and the two-dimensional printed book. This exploration and research will cause us to ask specific questions concerning narrative, authorship, linearity, and believability and from it we can gain knowledge applicable to the future of both the two-dimensional printed book and the hypertextual environment. Read Less
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