Showcase & Discover Creative Work Sign Up For Free
Hiring Talent? Post a Job

Bēhance

  • Oceanic: Horizon

    Arne Naess, who first termed ‘Deep Ecology’, describes a unique heightened experience, where one feels a self-realisation that one is intrinsically connected to nature - ‘a feeling often called oceanic because many have had this feeling on the ocean’.
  • The Horizon series explores the infinity of nature by investigating the obscure point where the sky touches the sea. The presence or absence of a horizon stimulates ideas and questions and draws the viewer’s attention to the infinity of nature. Jay Appleton in TheExperience of Landscape, discusses how contemplating the horizon directs attention:

    ‘particularly to speculation about what lies beyond it, and the horizon itself seems to be the key which can provide the answer to such speculation’.

    The Horizon pieces have an illusion of a certain depth, yet not a depth the viewer can move forward into - an obscure uninviting space. For instance, in figure 1 the horizon line is not defined, rather floats into an empty sky. The eye does not navigate the horizon easily and instead one is lost in the vast white sky, without cloud, star or life. The obscurity of this undefined horizon hopefully raises questions about the future of the dark, stirred waters beneath. The viewer cannot see clearly what is next and is left to contemplate their place in the scene, their place in nature, and hopefully their relationship to something beyond.


  • Figure 1. Sophie Bray, Oceanic: Horizon, 2010, Pencil on paper, 50 x 66 cm.
  • Figure 2. Sophie Bray, Oceanic: Horizon, 2010, Pencil on paper, 50 x 66 cm.
  • Figure 3. Sophie Bray, Oceanic: Horizon, 2010, Pencil on paper, 50 x 66 cm.
  • Figure 4. Sophie Bray, Oceanic: Horizon, 2010, Pencil on paper, 50 x 66 cm.
  • Figure 5. Sophie Bray, Oceanic: Horizon, 2010, Pencil on paper, 50 x 66 cm.