Share
Project Views
Appreciations
591
Followers
222
Following
183
Valerie G., urban vinyl and mixed media artist, was born in New York City. Her work has been featured online in Juxtapoz, EvilMonito, Sci-Fi Photo Journal, Chron.com, the Houston Press, Fresh Arts, The Leader, Culturemap, the OC Register, the LA Beat, Toysrevil, Tenacious Toys, The Toy Viking, Bean Pot Toiz, Gian… Read More
Valerie G., urban vinyl and mixed media artist, was born in New York City. Her work has been featured online in Juxtapoz, EvilMonito, Sci-Fi Photo Journal, Chron.com, the Houston Press, Fresh Arts, The Leader, Culturemap, the OC Register, the LA Beat, Toysrevil, Tenacious Toys, The Toy Viking, Bean Pot Toiz, Giant Robot, Tomopop, and Vinyl Pulse, among others.

During the past few years, Valerie has exhibited her work in the Los Angeles metro area at the Japanese American National Museum, Giant Robot, 423West Gallery, and the Pasadena Convention Center. Her work has also been shown at Tomodachi (St. Paul, MN), Atomic Books (Baltimore, MD), the Jacob Javits Center (New York, NY), the San Diego Convention Center (San Diego, CA), The Quixotic World (Dallas, TX), and The Marchesa Hall and Theatre (Austin, TX). In addition to being a regular member of the First Saturday Arts Market, Valerie’s work has been shown in Houston at the Hardy & Nance Street Studios, Winter Street Studios, East End Studio Gallery, the Lawndale Art Center, Insomnia Video Game Culture, Public House Heights, Gen’s Antiques, the Barbara Bush Branch Library, the George R. Brown Convention Center, and Kallinen Contemporary.


Read Less
Born in New York City, many of my artistic influences have come from countless trips to MoMA and the Guggenheim Museum, as well as from pop culture, graffiti, Asian art, and most recently, assemblage art and the Steampunk genre.

The majority of my training has been in the areas of ceramic sculpture and pottery, h… Read More
Born in New York City, many of my artistic influences have come from countless trips to MoMA and the Guggenheim Museum, as well as from pop culture, graffiti, Asian art, and most recently, assemblage art and the Steampunk genre.

The majority of my training has been in the areas of ceramic sculpture and pottery, however, I have really fallen in love creating custom vinyl art toys. These one-of-a-kind pieces can contain any combination of materials, such as: acrylic paint/ink, polymer clay, wood, vintage clock and watch parts, vintage jewelry and jewelry castings, brass and copper hardware, leather, faux fur, semi-precious gemstones, vintage coins and transit tokens, and glass taxidermy eyes. For the customization, I typically use rare and designer vinyl figures and Japanese Sofubi, however, I have started to work with vintage toy cars and other found objects as well.

I have really enjoyed researching and digging up a variety of odds and ends to complete my Steampunk assemblage pieces. Each creature is comprised of a variety of new and used items- some with an extensive past history. In my version of Steampunk, each creature is “powered” by a combination of technical elements (gears, wind-up keys, propellers) as well as some elements of nature (flowers, animals, semi-precious gemstones). These figures are typically numbered, and contain vents and exhaust pipes for the “steam” to escape. Traveling doesn’t come cheap these days, therefore vintage transit tokens and coins are used to pay for the critters’ “passage”. I also spend a great deal of time painting the vinyl to look like a variety of oxidized metals.

On the other side of the color spectrum, reside my customized vinyl art toys and paintings utilizing my monster “graffiti” style, which originated from my miniature polymer clay monster figures. These pieces are painted with extremely bright colors and sometimes contain hand-sculpted polymer clay accessories and features in addition to the “graffiti.” I have been inspired by Asian art for a very long time, and some of these intensely-colored creatures are representative of the signs of the Chinese Zodiac and contain the colors of the five elements of Chinese philosophy, as well as a variety of five-petal plum blossoms for good luck.
Read Less
Member since: