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As far as I remember, I was always fond of printmaking techniques. For the last few years, folk engravings started to interest me the most. Folk woodcut became my source of inspiration. It casts reflections and encourages creative explorations.
Woodcut is both very simple and very complicated technique. It is the … Read More
As far as I remember, I was always fond of printmaking techniques. For the last few years, folk engravings started to interest me the most. Folk woodcut became my source of inspiration. It casts reflections and encourages creative explorations.
Woodcut is both very simple and very complicated technique. It is the starting point of the engraving. Wood can bound artist, set him in the frame, but, at the same time it can give him hope to overcome boundaries.
I've started with copies of gravures of past centuries, and then my own prints, inspired by folk Ukrainian art, appeared.
Popular Christian themes - icons of St. Nicholas, St. George, St. Paraskeva, Intercession of the Virgin, the Archangel Michael, etc. are reproduced by folk artists with simple forms, generously decorated. Folk woodcut turns into the bridge between the master and the audience, penetrates deep into the soul, and stays there forever.
It seems like nothing more than the line and the spot, but, actually, limitations of the means of expression make gravure the perfect image itself.
The principle of printmaking dictates its style and imagery; therefore, it is extremely important for me to use wood for creating patterns. The process of cutting and overcoming the resistance of the material distinguishes engraving among other types of folk art. The main creative work is dedicated to pattern, but it is only an instrument for creating the artwork.
I am combining folk engravings with woodblock printing on textiles (technique of decorating homespun textiles with various patterns and ornaments with a help of special woodblocks), and have a hope to breathe in new life into old and unjustly forgotten techniques. Read Less
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