the "Other Teather"

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  • "THE OTHER TEATHER"
  • During the war of occupation between 1964 and 1973, Laos was called by some West journalists, to paraphrase the meaning of its old name, "the inhabited earth by a million insignificant". With the escalation of the conflict, the chronicle of the time confronting with a war that violated the Geneva Accords of 1962, which ratified the neutrality of Laos, permanently delete the name of the country and replace it with the name "the other teather". What I tried to do through the Laos has been documenting a country in transformation.  The result is a report that cover the issues of civil and religious society of a country, which, with its fragility exposed, is dignity rebuilding himself defending his icon of authenticity in the landscape geopolitical South-East Asia.
  • In Pakse, as in the rest of Laos, during the dry season the rudimentary boats sail regularly along the Mekong despite the low water level of the river
  • On the ferries to Pakse the comfort is not a standard, you navigate stowed for dayswhile the boredom accompanies long hours of navigation
  • Near Pakbeng is practiced horticulture by taking advantage of the banks of the Mekong not yetflooded by seasonal floods
  • In Pakse the ability of Laotians to cultivate the sandy shores of the Mekong in the months before the rains, it is a significant item in the economy of subsistence of the country
  • The difficulty of water supply during the season when the waters of the Mekong arelowest level, forces the young inhabitants of the village of Pakbeng to make constant trips withcontainer full of water along the stairs that go from the river to the village
  • Xieng Maeng, in remote villages street life replaces school education
  • In Pakbeng before the rains come, some children sliding down a meterfull level of the Mekong
  • In Laos the public elementary school lasts six years but 90% of students leave school beforeof the term. It is estimated that 40% of Lao citizens can not read, and the level of schooling isthe lowest in all of Asia.
  • While the monastic education is open only to male attendance is not the case inpublic schools. Sensitize young students to the care of the common good is one of the matters study.
  • Vientianne, Central Market Talat Khua Luang. In Laos traditional medicine is still widely diffused in popular consent
  • Tha Khaek. Women guests at a hotel near the Thai border
  • At the end of the school day the young monks of Wat Phuang in the village of Si Phan Don,returning to their homes. According to the Buddhist rule young people can frequent schoolsmonastic under 16 years of age, then have to decide whether to stay or go.
  • Luang Prabang, Wat Hosian. Many monks dedicate themselves to study or teaching
  • Most of the Buddhist temples built in the old Siamese style named Lanna, are located in Luang Prabang
  • Luang Prabang, an elderly woman leans against the front door of the Haw Pha Bang
  • At the gates of Wang Vieng a sign summed up in a picture the fundamental values ​​of Democratic Republic of Laos