Type Design/Poučni Sans
Add to Collection


Revival of the font found on a book cover. School project under mentorship of Nikola Djurek.
Poučni Sans - Font revival
I decided to revive title lettering from an old book published by the St. Jerome society and create the font - Poučni Sans. Poučni Sans is a typeface created by reviving the title lettering of the book Instructive conversations published in 1909. by the St. Jerome society.
The typography is low contrast intended for text and display, and there are basically 4 styles: regular, italic, bold and bold italic.
The interesting fact is that italic style is principally a deco style, inspired by letters O and Č from the cover of the book, and the other letters and details were built based on that.
Starting a revival
When doing a revival typeface the goal is not to make a digital copy of an existing typeface. The goal is to copy it to some degree, but also make improvements regarding spacing, tracking, and the form of a letter.
After doing that the next step can be adding your own feature, your own personal touch. That can be anything from an open type feature to a different font style. My personal touch was creating a deco looking italic style.
Font weights
First I went about creating the regular and bold styles.
After creating a regular and bold style my next step was in creating the italics. Italics were inspired by the letter "O" and "C" from the book cover.
It has swirly line that is entering the counter (the inside of the letter) from which I developed a series of glyphs with swashes. Because of that I got the distinctive form of an italic that I actually prefer to call "Deco" style.
Type specimen
Where could this font be usable?
Because of it's legibility, Poučni Sans can be used for body text in the normal style, while the italic style is intended for highlighting words, headings, subheadings and posters (mostly because of the art deco inspired swashes). There's also a set of alternate glyphs that can be used instead of lettering, when combined properly.
This was a student project mentored by Nikola Djurek, about which I wrote a blog post on infinum website.