Add to Collection
About

About

The series of prints “This Has Been and This Will Be” began as a simple experiment with the Xerox machine. I manipulated the Xerox machine’s abil… Read More
The series of prints “This Has Been and This Will Be” began as a simple experiment with the Xerox machine. I manipulated the Xerox machine’s ability to capture still images by attempting to create motion within those images. The result was a haunting set of copies that were able to translate an observable sense of time lapse within the still frame. I achieved this affect by moving my hand, face and other body parts across the machine as the machine was copying thus disrupting the Xerox machine’s normal process of capturing images. The time lapse captured by the Xeroxed images reflects the human obsession with preservation by exaggerating the ephemerality of the present. As humans, we feel constantly compelled to capture some part of our fleeting existence via photographs, written word, or other art because we are always aware of impending and inescapable death to the point that we’ve become hyper-obsessed with preservation. This piece attempts to evoke those feelings of inescapable mortality and of the struggle to preserve by capturing frozen moments of struggle. The piece was further informed through my reading of Roland Barthes’ Camera Lucida, which treads in similar subject matter. “Each photograph always contains the imperious sign of my future death,” says Barthes. But Barthes examines the photograph in other interesting ways which I’ve attempted to translate in the book portion of the piece. Barthes talks about the referent and the photograph being intrinsically linked. “They are glued together, limb by limb, like the condemned man and the corpse in certain tortures; or even like those pairs of fish which navigate in convoy, as though united by eternal coitus.” The book attempts to takes this concept to extreme measures by creating a series of successive referents each of which informs the last but become increasingly obscured from the original true referent. Read Less
Published: