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About

An exploration of the relationship between personal information and digital databases, by finding and investigating the person who stole my iPhon… Read More
An exploration of the relationship between personal information and digital databases, by finding and investigating the person who stole my iPhone. Read Less
Published:
The book about the one
who stole my iPhone
 
 
Perfect bound book
Edition of 1
Concept, copywriting, art direction and production
 
Autumn 2012
 
Typefaces: Theinhardt, Nimbus Roman
Paper: High gloss photo paper, Scandia
2000 90g/cm3
 
 
As a citizen of the technology-addicted world, I felt the downside of living and archiving my life digitally when my iPhone was stolen. Uncovering my need of communicating through digital devices and the unpleasant feeling of strangers having my personal information, layed the foundation for an eight-week project raising the question: “How can the increasing bond between the digital sphere and the physical world be illustrated through a stolen digital device?”
 
 
 
 
Brief summary of the project:
 
1. Pick pocket – theft of iPhone
 
2- Thief inserts own SIM-card before resetting my phone.
 
3. Thief's contacts and location automatically syncs with my iCloud acoount
 
4. With the whole contact list of the thief, but not the name or number for the thief itself, I start an investigation purely based on digital databases (search engines, online catalogues and social networks)
 
5. The investigation ends in a 120-page book, telling the story of how i found the thief. Part 2 of the book contains a catalogue of information about the thief, such as name, age, location, weight, social status, history, contact network and relations, as well as plenty of images.
  
 
 
 
The information is presented in the style of a sitemap/flowchart, referring to the hyperlinking between content sources that gave me access to the information.
 
 
 
In the end I had a complete contact list with all the important friends of the thief, including telephone numbers, adresses, links to Facebook profiles and age.
 
I literally experienced the life of another person through digital resources.
 
A black, high gloss cover sets the information in a personal, secured context – almost as a hard drive of secrets. The glossy cover is also vulnerable to fingerprints, making every viewer leave a personal trace on the book.