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The inhabited world is divided between the accessible and the inaccessible. Lands forbidden to access, like Chernobyl or Fukushima Daiichi, aband… Read More
The inhabited world is divided between the accessible and the inaccessible. Lands forbidden to access, like Chernobyl or Fukushima Daiichi, abandoned areas, industrial or military zones, can all be found both in fiction and reality. Impenetrable borders and barriers. A post-apocalyptic ambiance in these isolated zones and the phenomenon of exclusion of people in those spaces, creates a similar atmosphere to one that can be felt in the fictive Zone shown in the film Stalker. These sites are outside of regulation, and the architecture is often grand in scale. They could also be considered as the removed “lieu de mémoire”, an area that becomes the un-consciousness of the urban systems, a space of confrontation and contamination between the organic and the inorganic, between nature and artifice. They symbolize economic, cultural and social stagnation but they also are hidden maps of traces. Vestiges and remnants from hidden worlds that at the same time embody a forgotten reality or the forgotten sense of what is real or what was real, elements and strata of time or the time-capsule to an endless journey. Here is the metabolism of humanity’s discarded wastelands, or nature’s detritus :“If space-junk is the human debris that litters the universe, junk-space is the residue mankind leaves on the planet.”(3) These spaces are intertwined with the formal city in an informal and disconnected manner. This superimposition of the zones within the exterior world creates a radically different behaviour from the one normally used in the exterior, and highlights their potential as spaces of freedom in an urban environment that is increasingly standardised and regulated by urban explorers or fictive explorers like Stalker. Against the backdrop of a cityscape, an abandoned industrial space is often an ideal space for creativity, poetic imagination and exploration. This behaviour escapes to the scientific rationality and thus accesses to a mysticism that only the heterotopia can maintain as a space. Read Less
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