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'Digital Dimensions' was a juried group art exhibit that was held at Blackfish Gallery and included a variety of pieces that fell within the para… Read More
'Digital Dimensions' was a juried group art exhibit that was held at Blackfish Gallery and included a variety of pieces that fell within the parameters of 'digital art'. Although the image appears at first sight to be a panorama shot capturing what looks like a group act of vandalism at an archaeological site, it is actually a collage of two separate images taken 100 km and 2 months apart. The image on the right is of the Puma Punku, part of the first-millennium ceremonial complex of Tiwanaku in Bolivia. The image on the left is from a series of images I took of an experiment in Pre-Columbian stone transport that I was overseeing as part of the larger Qala Yampu Project. The title of the piece comes from the group foreman's remark when I informed them they could only use tools that would have been available in Pre-Conquest times (i.e., not the shiny new shovels and pickaxes they had brought along). My intention with the piece was to restore a bit of the human element to our perception of archaeological sites. Read Less
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The Gringos want us to use our hands
Exhibited as part of 'Digital Dimensions', Blackfish Gallery, March 2008.
'Digital Dimensions' was a juried group art exhibit that was held at Blackfish Gallery and included a variety of pieces that fell within the parameters of 'digital art'.  Although the image appears at first sight to be a panorama shot capturing what looks like a group act of vandalism at an archaeological site, it is actually a collage of two separate images taken 100 km and 2 months apart.  The image on the right is of the Puma Punku, part of the first-millennium ceremonial complex of Tiwanaku in Bolivia.  The image on the left is from a series of images I took of an experiment in Pre-Columbian stone transport that I was overseeing as part of the larger Qala Yampu Project.  The title of the piece comes from the group foreman's remark when I informed them they could only use tools that would have been available in Pre-Conquest times (i.e., not the shiny new shovels and pickaxes they had brought along).  My intention with the piece was to restore a bit of the human element to our perception of archaeological sites.