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About

About

I spend time with Gerald Martindale, carrillonneur at the Metropolitan United Church, and see what it's like to ring the bells.
Published:
The Bell Man
A life of ringing bells
"Playing the carillon is a very unique instrument because you're playing for the whole neighbourhood. You're not just playing for a small audience in some hall or home. You're playing for the whole community. It's rewarding to know that your music is touching a lot of people." - Gerald Martindale, Carrillonneur
"Last summer I completed my 13th American tour and my 5th European tour. I've often presented recitals in Holland and Belgium, but in many other European countries, too. I've played in England, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Lithuania, Germany, Switzerland, Belgium..." - Gerald Martindale
"In most cases you're playing quite high up in the tower so, therefore, you don't hear applause. You just have to hope that people are listening and enjoying your music. Occasionally people do come up to me after I've played and say, 'Oh, I liked your performance and I enjoyed your music.' That's gratifying to hear." - Gerald Martindale
"Playing the carillon is a very unique instrument because you're playing for the whole neighbourhood. You're not just playing for a small audience in some hall or home. You're playing for the whole community. It's rewarding to know that your music is touching a lot of people." - Gerald Martindale
"At the Metropolitan United Church, I have to climb 100 steep stairs up a spiral staircase to reach my carillon playing room. Some towers are lower than others. Sometimes there's less climbing involved, and a few towers even have elevators." - Gerald Martindale