Add to Collection


Projects completed during my study:
Hand rendering of "AX"
Hand rendering of Samsung concept phone
Hand rendering of Dirt Devil concept
Graphite drawing 36"x24"
Charcoal drawing 24"x36"
Final Mockup of Cross Chair
Ebonizing the wood on the Cross Chair
Mockup of Cross Chair
Rendering of Cross Chair
Model of Cross Chair
Model of Cross Chair
Drawings for "Correct/Incorrect"
Final model of "Correct/Incorrect". This was a project to beautifully combine two opposites, mine being the symbol for correct (the "check") and the symbol for incorrect (the "X").
Initial sketches for the "Two-Faced Lamp"
Lit photo of final model for the "Two-Faced Lamp"
Final model for the "Two-Faced Lamp". This lamp was made from 2-way mirrored acrylic which allowed it to be reflective until turned on, when it became transparent. Once transparent, it showed a silhouette of an 18th century glass chamber lamp. With a touch activated switch, it was a strive for a modern spin on an 18th century piece. This project was later submitted to the Philadelphia Museum of Art for the annual Collab competition.
These next two projects were designed for a 10 year old boy named Tommy who has Autism. I made him these objects to better his life as much as I could. Tommy had mainly 2 issues. First, he couldn't concentrate at all when he tried to do his homework at his cluttered house. Second, he had a digital fixation which basically means he can't stop touching things or playing with things with his fingers. He would take apart the threads in his school uniform and come home with torn shirts.

The first thing I made for him is the "Attention Desk." This is simply a plain white portable desktop that allows him to focus better and concentrate on his homework. It is the exact size of his desk at school during the day, and his assistant carries it to his house at night so he can do his homework.
Drawing of "Controlled Distraction" concept
To satisfy his need to touch things I made him the "Controlled Distraction" which is a rubber bracelet that can be played with when he needs and concealed in his sleeve when it is not needed. The material is a soft, non-toxic, synthetic rubber (like a Koosh ball) so he can satisfy his fixation without doing it in a destructive way. He can pull on it and play with it as much as he wants as it sits right in his hand.