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My Masters Thesis Work: This project takes the position that our current architectural conventions of site analysis are too detached and too quan… Read More
My Masters Thesis Work: This project takes the position that our current architectural conventions of site analysis are too detached and too quantitative to fuel our qualitative design processes. I believe we are "seeing" our site with biased eyes - only architectural eyes. In attempt to see the site in greater resolution, I look through the eyes of three other professions: The Radiologist, The Pilot, and The Fly Fisherman. By seeing the site through their eyes, I am able to start seeing qualities of the site unseen before. Qualities that can then leverage the design process. Read Less
Published:
How the Pilot Sees
Thesis Work, Part 2

The Pilot sees the world from a point far above. From this distance, the Pilot can not perceive detail or texture, instead he sees one unified surface of various color and topography. He is most interested in long, clear stretches of land where he land his plane or take off from. 
For this project, I look through the eyes of the Pilot at Potsdamer Platz in Berlin, Germany. The Pilot doesn't see buildings, shoppers, and major urban thoroughfares. He sees a mountainous landscapes. He understands how to roll his plane 90 degrees to fit between two skyscrapers. He sees a tall building as just a long surface to fly down. 
But the Pilot doesn't only see the world through his window, he also uses the telemetry inside the cockpit to help him navigate - to aid in 'seeing'. When he is using his telemetry, the world looks like a series of numbers and dials. The landscape is registered as specific elevations and windspeeds. 
The pilot also has the distinct ability to turn the world upside down. We live our whole lives with a very specific perception of "right side up". The pilot can turn that entire notion quite literally upside down such that the world might be above him.