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Poster series, campaign and submission for Poster for Tomorrow’s latest call for entires from the organisation’s latest creative 2013 brief: A Ho… Read More
Poster series, campaign and submission for Poster for Tomorrow’s latest call for entires from the organisation’s latest creative 2013 brief: A Home for Everyone. A Place to live, not sleep. Everyone deserves a home. Read Less
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Campaign series submission for 4 Tomorrow’s latest call for entires from the organisation’s latest creative 2013 brief: A Home for Everyone. A Place to live, not sleep. Everyone deserves a home.
 
‘Home’ means something different to all of us. The place where we grew up, the place where we live and the place we come to relax and take for granted after a hard days work. But for far too many people home remains a distant dream, a place to aspire to as they eke out in sub standard accommodation or where many people sleep rough, take shelter and have nowhere else to go. The United Nations has enshrined the right of every man, woman and child to a place to live. The overall message being ‘We all deserve a home’.
 
Our solution was to look at the common door mat as a key symbol of warmth, welcome and security of ‘the home’. The ‘act’ of returning home is something which people across the world take for granted. To ‘Wipe your feet’ is also a symbolic gesture of ignoring or disregarding something or someone or in this sense the issue at hand.
 
To achieve this, we used the existing language of door mat phrases and added our own ironic copy around the main phrases ‘Welcome’, ‘Home’ and ‘Wipe your feet’. For the final solution to the campaign series we created handmade stencil’s of the typography and applied all weather spray paint to the coir mats.
 
The door mats were placed at random, in doorways in UK city centre areas and other places to convey the message to a wider audience. An ongoing campaign, which can address, create awareness and constantly remind ourselves of the growing problem of global housing and homelessness.
 
Film by: Gary Rennie