Partition - Frame
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About

About

Project made at the Danish Art Workshops.
Published:
Introduction

In the project PARTITION we work with temporary spatial changes.
Two very different screens, "frame" and "columns" provide a new way of seeing the modern room divider.
 
The screen wall is the resident's ability to transform his home - and there is often a gradual need for a dwelling to be reorganized.
The screen wall has a long history both as a design object and convenient installation to partition space.
But we would like to challenge the way it typically has been used in - so it becomes more than just a straight way to divide space with a smooth surface, yes it´s very convenient, but also very static and often not so flexible.

The partition function as a transformable installment that can be assembled or extended by the given situation. A solid or a hinted wall in fragments, it´s all about how it changes our physical and visual perception of a room and it´s spatial structure.
Frame
 
The frame refers to the structural character of the conventional plasterboard partition.
Inserted in all posts and horizontal bands in the frame are round dowels, which partly have a constructive function in joints, but also gives the frame a distorted physicality and invite one to hang something on the wall.
The frame can be formed to stand in a straight line, a zig-zag shape and a curled shape that can form an enclosure.
Materiality and aesthetics
 
Our approach, both in devoloping and in the execution of the project, has been about using furniture craft
traditions and techniques.
The screens are in their present scale built for space with a ceiling height of about 2.70 meters (8,9 ft) - and is mounted by means of threads that can be adjusted according to the height of the room.
Both screens are crafted from red alder.
Threads are solid brass.
The frame measures in its broadest lineup
width: 328 cm, depth: 24 cm, height: 270 cm (+ / - 12 cm).
width: 10,8 ft, depth: 9,45 inch, height: 8,9 ft (+ / - 5 inch)
Our gratitude goes out to the nice people at the Danish Art Workshops and the Danish Arts Foundation