Nepal an Intimate look
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About

This book is a selection of Christopher Villano's photographs and journal entries from his travels to Nepal in 2009. Its a collection of revealin… Read More
This book is a selection of Christopher Villano's photographs and journal entries from his travels to Nepal in 2009. Its a collection of revealing portraits, poignant life moments and written notes which disclose the story a journey and a timeless perspective of a culture and its people. Built from a 30 day journey where Villano traveled through Nepal's cities and rural country in search this narrative. Read Less
Published:
A preview of my book: 
 Nepal, An intimate look 
It is a land of geographical extremes, where breathtaking elevations
share landscapes with the abundant rivers sliding down from the
Himalayas. I was here for 30 days in the fall of 2010, searching,
trekking and exploring the land as much as one photographer can,
all while trying to avoid the hordes of tourists and those ever lovable
cliché tourist opportunities.
On the morning of Oct 1st , I was standing atop Poon Hill, engulfed
by nearly 100 people who were busy invading my usable space. Out
of this frustration, I pointed to a distant ridgeline where I noticed a
structure deep in the landscape. I knew right then that this is where I
needed to be. I turned to my guide and said, "Luxman, we have to
get to that building." He looked at me with an unsatisfied glare and
said, "Chris, I have no clue how we get there.”
After discussing my plan with some locals, and with the added
assistance of one still hung over from his previous night’s endeavors,
we ventured out towards this distance destination. Some suggested
we were trekking to what was to be an unfinished tea house or
possibly a family’s yak farm, it did not matter. I was certain I stood a
better chance of capturing the images that I sought once we
arrived. After fifteen hours and closer to 13,000 above sea  level, we
An Intimate look at Nepal
arrived at the half-finished tea house. Just in time for dinner and for
me to teach the Sherpa, Luxman, and our hung over volunteer how
to cook scramble eggs and fried potatoes.
When you first arrive in Kathmandu you are instantly bombard by its
frenetic energy. Driving across dusty, untamed roads, you are just as
likely to run across a monkey as easily as a family of four speeding
passed on