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Mixing Message is a project that aimed the search of the essence of themes related with design paradigms. For that it was necessary the approach … Read More
Mixing Message is a project that aimed the search of the essence of themes related with design paradigms. For that it was necessary the approach of many historic references and critics related with the themes referred in a set of suggested articles. From those I chose “There’s such Thing as Society” (1994) by Andrew Howard, an english graphic designer, critic and curator, that since 1989 lives in Portugal, in Porto. Read Less
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Mixing Message was a project that aimed the search for subjects related with social responsability in design's practice. Which implied an approach between historical references and critical articles related with design paradigms. The one I follow was “There’s such Thing as Society” (1994) an article written by Andrew Howard, an english graphic designer, critic and curator, that since 1989 lives in Portugal, in Porto, and that with this title  wanted to make a reference/critic to the famous expression "There's no such thing as Society" said by Margaret Tatcher.

I chose these article because it addresses issues as the role of design in society, the social, artistic and professional responsibility of this field according to a determined cultural context, that in the case of this article was the post modernism.

To this article I connected references as the book "L'ère du vide"(1983) by the french philosopher Gilles Lipovetsky, First Things First manifest, launched in 1964 by the british designer Ken Garland, and signed by many others. The same manifesto  revisited in 2000, launched with the same name and signed by famous designers around the world. Another reference was The Review page of The Guardian journal of 1988, written and designed by Neville Brody and Jon Wozencroft, and outside from the english context the text “Beyond Pro Bono: graphic design’s social work” by Anne Bush published in Steven Heller's book "Citizen Designer".