Minatori/Mineros/Miners, the last Italian coal miners
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The realization of photographic portraits of the coal miners at Carbosulcis of Nuraxi Figus, in Gonnesa, in the Province of Carbonia Iglesias in … Read More
The realization of photographic portraits of the coal miners at Carbosulcis of Nuraxi Figus, in Gonnesa, in the Province of Carbonia Iglesias in Sardinia, culminates in the realization of a photographic exhibit. The intent is to encourage a greater knowledge and consciousness of the condition of the miners, the last miners in the last coal mine still active in the entire Italian territory, through photography that aims not to document but capture the story that the miners' faces can help tell of the mining world. The mine is a place where many lines of analysis and conclusions can be made. This setting, in fact, reflects a deep scar in the identity of the Sulcis Iglesiente population. A meditative photography that moves away from the classic representation of the image of the miner during work activity, beyond the stereotypical photography of this class of workers, to tell the story of the mine through their faces. Thus determining the choice of non environmental portraiture, black and white portraits against a white background. In summary, a different way to describe the existence of people who quietly live dramatic and thrilling experiences every day, that maybe no one will ever be able to tell like their looks. Adriano Mauri waited for this project for a long time, it was probably all in his head and his visions for years. This is a project based on waiting through a process of time that is precisely that of photographic technique: Mauri waits on the surface of the earth, in broad daylight, men that arrive from the deep dark, out of the black (I am reminded of strange upside-down darkroom analogies when the paper fills with black and grey) and he isolates them against a white backdrop, he detaches them from the world: they are enough, those bodies that lead to those faces, that tell the stories of lives and struggle, and that tell it all in the most natural way, never a sensationalism. Straightforward men and straightforward gazes, dry and very beautiful photographs. The life of Adriano Mauri is photography (actually it would be correct to say that photography entered into the Mauris lives generations ago with a great-grandfather, a pioneer of photographic art), and he knows photography and delves into it: this project is born out of the great portrait tradition of the twentieth century, but above all, out of the life of Adriano and his connection with his land and his people. Marco Delogu Read Less
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