Media Magnetism: How to Attract the Favorable Publicity
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"Media Magnetism: How to Attract the Favorable Publicity You Want and Deserve" teaches artists, small business owners, and entrepreneurs how to u… Read More
"Media Magnetism: How to Attract the Favorable Publicity You Want and Deserve" teaches artists, small business owners, and entrepreneurs how to use marketing and PR to gain publicity for their product, service, or cause. Copyright 2012 Edited By Christina Hamlett Read Less
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I'm one of the contributing authors on "Media Magnetism: How to Attract the Favorable Publicity You Want and Deserve." The book can be purchased on Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble.com. Please visit Media Magnetism to learn more about the book and authors.

Below is my contribution to the "First Impressions" chapter in "Media Magnetism: How to Attract the Favorable Publicity You Want and Deserve."

Chapter: First Impressions
From the Desk of Amandah Blackwell


Press Kit Primer

The purpose of a press kit – also known as a media kit – is to provide pre-packaged promotional materials for a person, company, organization to members of the media, especially those within radio and TV. They’re often used to announce a book or product release, news conference, new company, mergers and acquisitions, new CD or movie, or event. The goal is to create as much “buzz” as possible.

If you’re an author or entrepreneur, a press kit shows you’re an expert in your field and that you know how you solve peoples’ problems. If you’re an artist or musician, your press kit could make the difference if you’re booked in art galleries or concert halls. You want to ensure your message is received loud and clear. A radio producer wants to attract current and potential listeners. A television producer wants to attract old and new viewers. A school wants to inform students and parents.

Many artists, authors, speakers, writers, and professionals don’t have a press kit, however, because they either don’t believe they really need one or just don’t know what to include. If you want to get on TV or radio, speak at corporations, high schools, colleges and universities, or attract people to your event, a press kit is essential. It’s also your ‘golden ticket’ if you want to be featured on the local drive-time radio or news show or national news program.

The press kit is your chance to make a great first impression on radio and television producers, vendors, prospective clients, investors, reporters, etc. It’s your calling card to let people know who you are and what you’re doing.

Whether or not your press kit is simple or elaborate is up to you. The bottom line is to make sure it’s professional and stands out from other press kits!

Your press kit could catapult you onto the radar of many influential people. The key point about a press kit is to remember that producers, reporters, investors, directors, etc. are inundated with them. Make yours stand out by sending it in a red, blue, green, orange, florescent yellow or some other bright colored envelope. If you have a lot of materials, send them in a black or bright colored box. Sending a press kit in a boring manila envelope or brown box simply won’t make an impression!

If you’re an author or writer, you’d want to include the following items:

Articles you wrote
Press clippings
Headshot
Autographed copy of book or audio CD or DVD
Cover letter (personalized) with logo
Copies of speeches and presentations
Reviews of your book
Business card
Post card
Curriculum Vitae and/ or list of accomplishments
Journal with your book cover on the front of it (if you wrote a book that’s inspirational and motivational)
Mug with your logo, book cover, etc. on it
One sheet (glossy) with quotes from you, paragraph blocks, sample of client list, and picture of you.

If you’re a musician or in a band you’d want to include the following items:

Reviews of your CD
Artist bio page or band bio
Press clippings
Artist photo or band photo Demo CD (3 or 4 songs)
Cover letter (personalized) with logo
Song list / gig sheet
Lyrics sheet (optional)
Demo flash drive
Artist or band business card
Booking page / Artist or band contact page
Music equipment page

If you’re an entrepreneur, the following items are recommended for inclusion:

Articles you wrote
Reviews and testimonials about your product or service
Press clippings
Headshot
Cover letter (personalized) with logo
Testimonies
Copies of speeches and presentations
Business card
Brochure
Post card
Curriculum Vitae and/ or list of accomplishments
Autograph copy of book or audio CD or DVD
One sheet (glossy) with quotes from you, paragraph blocks, sample of client list, and picture of you.

Use a two-pocket folder and glue/ place your logo, book cover, CD cover, etc. on the front of the folder. If you want to spend the extra money, have folders printed with your logo, CD cover, book cover, etc.

The following items go on the left-hand side of the folder:

Photographs
Show pitch (write an eye-catching headline). Include a list of bullet points you’ll address on the show. In the upper left-hand corner write “Available for Interview.”
Press release with a list of 10-15 sample questions behind it.
Company profile and fact sheets
Bio
Case studies, reviews, or testimonies
Brochure, newsletter, catalog, or some other business literature

The following items go on the right-hand side of the folder:

Business card
Press clippings
Articles and reprints
Copies of speeches and presentations
Letters of recommendation

If you’re sending a press kit to a radio producer, you’ll want to include one sheet that identifies with bullet points what you’ll be speaking about on the show. List at least five to ten points that will grab the producer’s attention. Don’t shy away from controversy because it does sell. If you’re a nonprofit, chances are you’re trying to create excitement for an upcoming event with the goal being to raise awareness and money. Put together an outstanding press kit and you’ll exceed your expectations!

Once you have your press kit assembled, put it a bright colored envelope or box and use a Sharpie to address it to a specific person such as a producer, reporter, marketing director, creative director, investor, etc. Make sure you have the proper spelling of the person’s name! Contact the person and describe your press kit to ensure the person or their assistant recognizes and receives it.

Mail the press kit and follow up to make sure it was received. If you don’t hear from your contact after two or three weeks, send an email or call them. It’s also good to maintain contact by sending updated information like additional press releases and clippings.

*Copyright 2012. Edited By Christina Hameltt. Outskirts Press, Inc.