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The story behind Laprade Absinthe. Henri Laprade was enrolled in the army when France went to war in Algeria. He got the taste for absinthe, wh… Read More
The story behind Laprade Absinthe. Henri Laprade was enrolled in the army when France went to war in Algeria. He got the taste for absinthe, which the French army used as malaria medicine for their soldiers. As the war went on Henri got the idea to start an absinthe distillery if he ever survived it. The war ended in 1848 and a surviving Henri moved on to start a distillery with his father in the French Alps; more precise in Montbrison, Loire. They set out to make the best absinthe no matter the cost, and decided to use only local ingredients grown on their farm and around Montbrison. The premium herbs and spices in addition to being stored a minimum of a year in handmade clay bottles - made from clay found at the summit of mount Brison - gave the drink it's distinct taste. After perfecting the recipe for years, Henri died in 1903 leaving the distillery in the capable hands of his son. Absinthe got banned in France in 1914, leading to a full stop of the production. The recipe was however kept, and when the ban ceased after 86 years it was brought back in production in 2000 by Victor Laprade; Henri's great grandson. He modernised the production and the design but left the recipe exactly as Henri perfected it. Read Less
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Laprade Absinthe
The story behind Laprade Absinthe. 
Henri Laprade was enrolled in the army when France went to war in Algeria. He got the taste for absinthe, which the French army used as malaria medicine for their soldiers. As the war went on Henri got the idea to start an absinthe distillery if he ever survived it. The war ended in 1848 and a surviving Henri moved on to start a distillery with his father in the French Alps; more precise in Montbrison, Loire. They set out to make the best absinthe no matter the cost, and decided to use only local ingredients grown on their farm and around Montbrison. The premium herbs and spices in addition to being stored a minimum of a year in handmade clay bottles - made from clay found at the summit of mount Brison - gave the drink it's distinct taste.  After perfecting the recipe for years, Henri died in 1903 leaving the distillery in the capable hands of his son. Absinthe got banned in France in 1914, leading to a full stop of the production. The recipe was however kept, and when the ban ceased after 86 years it was brought back in production in 2000 by Victor Laprade; Henri's great grandson. He modernised the production and the design but left the recipe exactly as Henri perfected it.