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About

About

As a Northern Ireland landscape photographer and portrait photographer, I am absolutely dedicated to creating the perfect image for my client. I … Read More
As a Northern Ireland landscape photographer and portrait photographer, I am absolutely dedicated to creating the perfect image for my client. I trust that what you see in these pages will prove that and inspire you to work with me. Read Less
Published:
Landscapes of Ireland
New Perspectives on Irish Places by Fergal Kearney
Anyone who knows Ireland or who imagines Ireland will have some visual association with the place.  No where else of comparable size has produced such outstanding literature, music and art, so it is little wonder then that people around the world will have some spiritual or creative connection. 

As a resident of Northern Ireland, I have always been very conscious of how the international perception of a place is often presented through the distorted lens of the media.  While there have been many truths in the reportage of Ireland's recent history, those images have always sat uncomfortably with the reality of growing up in this unusual, but utterly compelling part of the Island.

I have been photographing Ireland for many years, but the work here in these pages is more recent dating from 2005.  I endeavour to capture my images from curious angles, getting off the beaten track to explore common places from new angles, or to capture images of places never before seen through a lens.  This short perspective will, I hope, go some way to addressing the conventional view of Ireland as a troubled land.  Welcome to my reality and to the real Ireland.
The Magillicuddy's Reeks mountain range in County Kerry has the highest peaks in Ireland, including Ireland's highest, Carranuntoohil. This image was captured from the Slea Head, across Dingle Bay, some thirty miles away, in April 2011.
Mt. Croagh Patrick (also spelled Croach Patrick) is a mountain near the town of Westport in County Mayo, Ireland. Each year, as many as one million pilgrims and visitors make the trek to the top to pray at the stations of the cross, participate in Mass, do penance (in which case the rocky journey is undertaken barefoot) or just enjoy the spectacular view.
Mt. Croagh Patrick (also spelled Croach Patrick) is a mountain near the town of Westport in County Mayo, Ireland. Each year, as many as one million pilgrims and visitors make the trek to the top to pray at the stations of the cross, participate in Mass, do penance (in which case the rocky journey is undertaken barefoot) or just enjoy the spectacular view.
The striking granite peaks of the majestic Mourne Mountains in County Down, Northern Ireland taken from the ramparts of Dundrum Castle in July 2011.
Overlooking the town of Dundrum in County Down, Northern Ireland, the castle was built by John de Courcy at the beginning of the 1200s and enjoys commanding views over Dundrum Bay and the Mountains of Mourne.
Taken from Carrickfin on a damp September afternoon in 2008, Errigal Mountain appears slowly as the rain clears. County Donegal, Ireland.
Malin Head is usually described as the most northerly point of the island of Ireland although that honor belongs to nearby Banba's Crown. This wooden cross sits on a peninsula overlooking the constant swell of the Atlantic and most likely commemorates all those who left Ireland for the new world.
The Conor Pass is the highest mountain pass in Ireland, its narrow, twisting road taking you through the heart of the Brandon Mountain Range in County Kerry, Ireland. From its summit, enjoy spectacular views of the Dingle Peninsula and the wonders of the glacial landscapes of Ireland's far west.  To give you some idea of scale, those little lines leading to the shoreline of the lake are roads!
Taking its name from St Finbar, who it is believed built a monastery on the island in the 6th Century, although the current church in this image dates from the early 1700s. This image was captured at Easter 2011.
The headland of Torr Head in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, was an important signal post, recording the passage of transatlantic ships in the 1800s. All that remains today is a ruined signal station, but the landscape and the views remain as timeless as ever.
The Brandon Group of mountains lie on the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland and hosts Ireland's ninth highest peak, seen here on a clear April afternoon in 2011.
The 300 acre forest of Moydamlaght at Mullaghmore Mountain, near Draperstown in County Derry, Northern Ireland puts on a multicolored display during early Autumn 2009.
Northern Ireland's only populated offshore Island, Rathlin is also home to tens of thousands of seabirds, as well as a rising population of 100 people. It sits some six miles of the mainland and is served by a ferry through the notorious Straits of Moyle. Taken in August 2011.
Slieve Binnian dominates the horizon across the Silent Valley Reservoir in the Mourne Mountains in County Down, Northern Ireland. Image captured in July 2011.
Take a country lane up into the high Sperrin Mountains in Northern Ireland on a wet Saturday in February and you will come across sights like these twin trees, standing guard over a laneway with surface run-off cascading, stream like, down the mountainside.
The wonderfully remote Murlough Bay is a place of outstanding natural beauty on Northern Ireland's famous Causeway Coast. At the base of the cliffs sits this small harbour, a place of solitude where you can look across to the Mull of Kintryre in Scotland, just 16 miles distant.
At the very end of a mountain track high up in the Sperrin Mountains, you will come to a gateway and discover this derelict farm cottage. Many such derelict building pepper the mountainsides of Ireland, given up long ago in favour of modern comforts. Taken Saturday 4th February 2012.