Jazz Legends: Part 1
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I have started a series of jazz portraits in capturing the smoky interior ambience of clubs in the 1940s and 1950s.
Published:
Jazz Legends: Part 1
A Series of Jazz Portraits in Progress
I have started a series of jazz portraits in capturing the smoky interior ambience of clubs in the 1940s and 1950s.
Prints are for sale at Fine Art America: http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/garth-glazier.html?tab=artworkgalleries&artworkgalleryid=105489
Thelonious Monk

I have started a series of jazz portraits in capturing the smoky interior ambience of clubs in the 1940s and 1950s. An odd genius, Thelonious Monk makes for a fascinating subject. I love the crazy hats he wore later in his career.
Ella Fitzgerald

Just finished the second in my jazz series. I am working in a more limited color palette from b+w photos. Always interesting to create color work from grayscale images.
Dizzy Gillespie

This was an interesting switch in style. Dizzy's face is more angular than Ella's and the light broke across the skin in a broken pattern. The effect is a bit more impressionistic.
John Coltrane
This energetic view of Coltrane prompted me to use dynamic shapes. His expression is
focused and creates a tension around the eyes an mouth.
 
2014 Jazz Series
LOUIS ARMSTRONG

This is the first in a follow up on my JAZZ series of illustrations from 2012. It felt good to switch gears and work on graphic portraits again.
BILLIE HOLIDAY

I had to do a portrait of Billie Holiday this summer. If any singer sizzles like a hot summer day its Billie.
WYNTON MARSALIS

This is the first of two portraits of Wynton. He has such a round face and soft features that it was hard to get a view of him where the light dramatically defined his likeness. This illustration shows him somewhat younger. I wanted the portrait to fit well with the series so choosing the right image to work with is important.
ORNETTE COLEMAN

Just finished another portrait in my jazz series. This dramatic view of Ornette Coleman was too good to pass up as a subject.