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About

About

An Inclusive camera that limits joint movement and improves accessibility to digital photography for those with dexterity problems.
Published:
Currently in the UK 1 in 5 people suffer from dexterity combined with an aging and technological savvy population. Digital compact cameras are difficult to grip and navigate due to their small size and buttons; they do not need to be the form they are. The opportunity to revolutionize the camera form and method of interaction inspired me to design an inclusive digital camera specifically designed for those with hand dexterity problems and an aging user group. 
The capture and zoom buttons are located on either side of the camera, in the natural resting position of the hand, allowing the user to operate the camera with one hand, regardless of weather they are right or left handed. The screen can be lifted to a 90 degree angle, allowing more flexibility for shooting perspectives. This subsequently allows the camerato be used at the traditional eye level perspective. 
Unlike a typical digital compact camera, the lens rotates 90 degrees fromlandscape to portrait, reducing wrist and finger movementcompared to traditionally turning the whole camera. Around thelens there are four high-powered flashes, providing a 360 degree flash. As the user rotates the lens from landscape to portrait, the screen interface automatically flips to adhere to the orientation.

A tripod attachment is included with the height specification model. When the camera is placed on the tripod attachment it auto-centres and secures the camera in place using a magnetic attraction.
The screen can be lifted to a 90o angle, allowing more flexibility for shooting perspectives. This subsequently allows the camera to be used at the traditional eye level perspective. 
The interface has been designed to be clear and intuitive with vivid colour being used to highlight settings, with the user associating colour with a specific setting. To keep the interface simple text has been removed and replaced with recognisable symbols. The 4 key functions that are most commonly used are located within a panel on the touch LCD display. To select a certain camera function the user taps the easily recognisable function icon which brings up further settings. Once a setting has been selected, to navigate through the different options the user simply swipes their finger in the direction they wish to navigate through. As the user rotates the lens from landscape to portrait, the screen automatically flips to adhere to the orientation.