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Imaginary Landscapes In this series titled, Imaginary Landscapes, I examine humanity’s attempt to understand the unknown using the past as a gu… Read More
Imaginary Landscapes In this series titled, Imaginary Landscapes, I examine humanity’s attempt to understand the unknown using the past as a guide. The images are surreal landscapes, created by compiling memories from the past in an effort to construct imagined scenarios of the future. The photo-illustrations discuss how our memories and subjective experiences influence our beliefs and predictions about the future, while also commenting on how we often manipulate and distort these memories in an effort to give them a new context and coherent structure. They are not meant to depict an actual future, but instead comment on how unknowable the future truly is. The images act as post – apocalyptic visions of a world built up from our minds attempts to fill in the blanks between what we know and what we can only guess at. These photo-illustrations represent a collection of nine images entitled, Imaginary Landscapes one through nine. They are a combination of digital and film shots compiled and printed digitally on 11 x 17 in. Velvet Fine Art Paper however, the actual image size is closer to 8.5 x 11 in. The smaller size fallows the example of many romantic painters who during part of the 19th century created smaller works meant for more personal engagement and individual confrontation. Read Less
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Imaginary Landscapes

          In this series titled, Imaginary Landscapes, I examine humanity’s attempt to understand the unknown using the past as a guide.  The images are surreal landscapes, created by compiling memories (old photographs) from the past in an effort to construct imagined scenarios of the future.  The photo-illustrations discuss how our memories and subjective experiences influence our beliefs and predictions about the future, while also commenting on how we often manipulate and distort these memories in an effort to give them a new context and coherent structure.  They are not meant to depict an actual future, but instead comment on how unknowable the future truly is.  The images act as post – apocalyptic visions of a world built up from our minds attempts to fill in the blanks between what we know and what we can only guess at.