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About

Ongoing illustration practice as I try to master drawing with brush-tip markers.
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About a week ago, I decided that I wanted to push myself as an artist. So much of my time is spent working on design, development, or writing, and I wanted to stretch myself and give myself a new artistic outlet through illustrations. In pulling out art supplies I hadn't used in some time, I decided I wanted to start using brush-tip markers for lettering and illustration.
This is my friend, Jes. I used a micron for finer details, a 40% cool grey Prismacolor Premier Brush | Fine marker, and a black Prismacolor brush-tip illustration marker on tracing paper. Photo reference credit goes to Justin Bean.
This is my friend, Lindsey, on her wedding day. I used a micron for finer details, a 40% cool grey Prismacolor Premier Brush | Fine marker, and a black Prismacolor brush-tip illustration marker on tracing paper. Photo reference credit goes to Sanderson Images.
This is my Twitter friend, Emily. She saw my portraits of Jes and Lindsey and wondered if I'd consider her for practice as well. I used a micron for finer details, a 40% cool grey Prismacolor Premier Brush | Fine marker, and a black Prismacolor brush-tip illustration marker on tracing paper. Photo reference credit goes to Stephanie Garvey Photography.
I decided that I wanted to move from sketches and tracings to a more artistic illustration approach with my friend Alyssa. I used Prismacolor Premier Brush | Fine markers for the entirety of the piece (30%, 40%, and 60% cool greys along with black), on marker paper. 
This is Michelle Dockery of Downton Abbey fame. I came across a new problem when I began to draw her - she is very pale-skinned, and a 30% cool grey was too dark for her skin. To solve this problem, I used a piece of glass as a palette and mixed 30% cool grey with my blending marker to achieve lighter skin tones.
This is Gina Torres of Firefly fame.
This is Bille Piper of Doctor Who fame.