Historical Adaptive Re-Use: Commercial + Residential
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A commercial building built in1860, the brick structure situated in the heart of the downtown had had multiple alterations to it's original appea… Read More
A commercial building built in1860, the brick structure situated in the heart of the downtown had had multiple alterations to it's original appearance over the decades, including at addition of a flimsy awning over the original brick arches and a cheap 70's storefront system replacing the wide plate-glass front windows. The project was to restore the facade of the original building (including reconstructing the three original dormers on the roof), refurbish the existing commercial spaces on the ground and basement floors, and build a rear addition allowing for new residential apartments. This project had added significance as, in addition to its placement in the core of historic downtown, the building also has rear frontage on the river running through the town. Therefore, access, visibility, and aesthetics needed to be addressed from all sides. Read Less
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Built in 1860, the commercial brick structure situated in the heart of downtown had multiple alterations to it’s original appearance implemented over the decades, including at addition of a flimsy awning over the original brick arches and a cheap 70's storefront system replacing the wide plate-glass front windows. The project was to restore the facade of the original building (including reconstructing the three original dormers on the roof), refurbish the existing commercial spaces on the ground and basement floors, and build a rear addition allowing for new residential apartments. This project had added significance as, in addition to its placement in the core of historic downtown, the building also has rear frontage on the river running through the town. Therefore, access, visibility, and aesthetics needed to be addressed from all sides.

Completed with Driver-Ryan Architects.
 
The existing front facade, showing the alterations that had been done over the years (awning, aluminum storefront systems, shrinking of the second story windows, removal of the original roof dormers)
Proposed Front Elevation: Restoring all elements of the original 1860 front facade (based on historical photographs), and restructuring the ground floor commercial spaces to open from a single central lobby space accessed from one entrance off the street
Proposed Side Elevation: With an access road to the river running alongside the building, an added opportunity for natural light and ventilation was present. Historical windows were restored, and new openings at key points were introduced. Additionally, a rear extension was added to the back of the building, flushing out the river-side elevation and adding square footage for new commercial and residential uses. A riverside pedestrian walkway, running the length of the river downtown, was collaborated upon by all owners along the riverfront. This included a level pavement, a barrier along the embankment that could double as seating, and period-appropriate lighting
Proposed Rear Elevation: The rear of the building reflects almost entirely the new construction of the addition. Here level changes (and ADA access to them) were of particular importance. The two penthouse apartments on the top floor have exterior roof decks overlooking the river. The materials used in the new construction flow seamlessly into the historical portion of the structure, while still denoting the presence of a modern addition