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The “Old World Arid Zone Belt” that stretches across Northern Africa and Northern Asia has given rise to many pastoral cultures. In India its lim… Read More
The “Old World Arid Zone Belt” that stretches across Northern Africa and Northern Asia has given rise to many pastoral cultures. In India its limit is marked by the Aravalli Mountain chain that runs in a northeast- southeast direction roughly from Delhi- Ahmadabad that is bordered by the Aravalli hills in the west is known as the Thar Desert which receives average annual rainfall ranging from 100-600 mm; it is subject to frequent droughts. For about 5000 years, many civilizations flourished in this region and Bharwad tribe is one of them. They originated from Mathura in Uttar Pradesh and migrated to the arid lands of Rajasthan and Gujarat. The term Bharwad is said to be a modified form of the word ‘Badawad’, from the Gujarati words ‘bada’ meaning sheep and ‘wada’ meaning enclosure. This name was said to be acquired by the Bharwad on the account of their traditional occupation of being shepherds. Animal rearing and fulfilling the survival requirements form animal derivatives is the basic feature of the pastoral mode of life of Bharwad. These groups living in total isolation from the agriculture population fully depend on the animal product availed from their herd. There is a great deal of uncertainty with regard to the impacts of climate change on their livelihoods. They are Hindu, and they pay special reverence to Lord Krishna. They were dressed in white, wore turbans and jewellery dangled off their necks, ears, wrists and around their waist. Since they are wanderers, they never build a house and always live under open sky; they are facing a number of threats, not the least of which is form non favourable climate change. Living in these harsh circumstances, they never look out of their body. Their skin became very hard, rough and tanned out in sun. There body is always covered with dust and they develop cracks in their ankles. Diseases affecting livestock which are projected to increase in scope and scale as a result of climate change, including Trypanosomiasis. Literacy has not made satisfactory progress within the community. The dispersed population, remote habitations, cultural uniqueness, low literacy rates and migratory lifestyles have contributed to this perception of their state. Read Less
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