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The Fear Factory, in the heart of Salt Lake City, Utah, is a haunted attraction running its third season. In 2010 the abandoned property was aqui… Read More
The Fear Factory, in the heart of Salt Lake City, Utah, is a haunted attraction running its third season. In 2010 the abandoned property was aquired, and the Fear Factory was born. Originally a cement factory dating back to the late 1800s, the factory is said to be haunted by the ghosts of numerous factory workers who suffered horrific deaths within its walls. "George Howe, charged with maintenance of the coal crusher, was one such worker. One evening, George was alone in the factory oiling the crusher before shutting it down for the night. As he reached across to apply oil deep within the crusher, the machine grabbed his sleeve and began slowly pulling him into its gears. George’s arm was first removed from the socket, then snapped and ripped from his body. Unable to free himself, the man was slowly but consciously pulled into the crusher. The roaring machinery and the solid factory walls silenced his cries. George Howe’s entire body was eventually twisted into the gears before being spit out as nothing more than a torn and mutilated collection of bloody flesh." Jibe was tasked with rebranding the Fear Factory, as well as a traditional advertising campaign (outdoor, print, etc.), a hefty and well-branded social media presence, and a revamped website (because of time and budget restraints, a Wordpress template was reskinned). Art direction by Kyle Harris. Read Less
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When you have an old, abandoned cement factory with a history of grizzly fatalities, your marketing shouldn’t look like everyone else’s. This campaign, aimed at driving ticket sales and online engagement, was entirely centered on the facility’s haunted history. Jibe created a website, social media assets, posters, tickets, coupons, billboards, kiosk displays, a Facebook app, a radio ad, and a YouTube video series. With such buzz worthy materials, there were plenty of Halloween enthusiasts waiting to be picked up at the zombie bus stop in downtown Salt Lake!  
 
 
The Fear Factory, in the heart of Salt Lake City, Utah, is a haunted attraction running its third season. In 2010 the abandoned property was aquired, and the Fear Factory was born.
 
Originally a cement factory dating back to the late 1800s, the factory is said to be haunted by the ghosts of numerous factory workers who suffered horrific deaths within its walls.
 
"George Howe, charged with maintenance of the coal crusher, was one such worker. One evening, George was alone in the factory oiling the crusher before shutting it down for the night. As he reached across to apply oil deep within the crusher, the machine grabbed his sleeve and began slowly pulling him into its gears. George’s arm was first removed from the socket, then snapped and ripped from his body. Unable to free himself, the man was slowly but consciously pulled into the crusher. The roaring machinery and the solid factory walls silenced his cries. George Howe’s entire body was eventually twisted into the gears before being spit out as nothing more than a torn and mutilated collection of bloody flesh."
 
 
 
 
 
Final logo. After some back-and-forth, the client decided to keep their original barcode wordmark, but went with a new illustration of their building.
Poster, 12" x 17"
Coupon, 5" x 7"
Outdoor
Outdoor, detail
Tiicket, 2" x 6"
City Weekly (local paper), 9.75" x 7.283"
Social media assets set up as an extension of the new brand
Examples of brand images created for social media to garner attention and presence in the local market.
Pandora radio ad tiles
KSL.com monster ad, 300 x 600 px
Promotional kiosk signage at a local shopping mall. During operating hours, visitors can purchase tickets to the Fear Factory here and ride the "Zombie Bus" to the attraction, 10 minutes away. Zombie graphic by Kyle Harris.
Custom bus stop sign for the Fear Factory's "Zombie Bus," which shuttles patrons back and forth between the mall and the Fear Factory, 12" x 17". I did not design the lower white sign.
The Comic Book Character Match Facebook app was designed by Kyle Harris.