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About

This first foray into typography was inspired by old marquee signage from classic American cities like Chicago, and by a Chekhovian attitude towa… Read More
This first foray into typography was inspired by old marquee signage from classic American cities like Chicago, and by a Chekhovian attitude towards the idea of the machine. I originally intended to make a no-frills, sturdy and structured three-dimensional typeface until I found that I enjoyed the geometry of the construction lines I used to make the letters better than whatever it was I was attempting. So, whatever it was I was working on was ditched, and I designed a font which hopefully pictures the complexity of the alphabet’s construction. This typeface was brought together by geometry and rigor, method and structure, and I felt that it needed a name that married the ideas I was trying to portray. I settled on creating a portmanteau from the previously mentioned Anton Chekhov – one of the greatest, most headstrong Russian writers of all time, who happened to also be a doctor – and Euclid – the “Father of Geometry”. Read Less
Published:
Typography | 2011
This first foray into typography was inspired by old marquee signage from classic American cities like Chicago, and by a Chekhovian attitude towards the idea of the machine. I originally intended to make a no-frills, sturdy and structured three-dimensional typeface until I found that I enjoyed the geometry of the construction lines I used to make the letters better than whatever it was I was attempting. So, whatever it was I was working on was ditched, and I designed a font which hopefully pictures the complexity of the alphabet’s construction. 
 
This typeface was brought together by geometry and rigor, method and structure, and I felt that it needed a name that married the ideas I was trying to portray. I settled on creating a portmanteau from the previously mentioned Anton Chekhov – one of the greatest, most headstrong Russian writers of all time, who happened to also be a doctor – and Euclid – the “Father of Geometry”.