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Escaping the hornswogglers and snozzwangers and those terrible wicked whangdoodles. Over 9,000 asylum seekers a year see the insides of 'removal … Read More
Escaping the hornswogglers and snozzwangers and those terrible wicked whangdoodles. Over 9,000 asylum seekers a year see the insides of 'removal centres'. At the same time British confectionary manufacturers are moving production of their products away from the UK to take advantage of cheaper labour and operating costs. Could the original Bournville model - a self-contained village for factory workers - be re-envisaged as a more productive architecture to house the 2000 people who are currently detained at any one time? Based on a reading of Roald Dahl's children's book, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and its conduct towards the factory's own migrant workers - the oompa-loompas - the project examines our current attitude towards immigration through a narrative of absurd spaces within the building. Situated in a public park where visitors can enjoy and experience the excess of all things chocolate, I explore the juxtaposition of spaces of imprisonment within the factory and the free-movement of goods. The notions of brand and national identity and perception of values, embedded in a product as innocuous as a chocolate bar, are also explored through manipulating the thresholds of public awareness of the presence of the work-force of asylum seekers Read Less
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Over 9,000 asylum seekers a year see the insides of 'removal centres'. At the same time British confectionary manufacturers are moving production of their products away from the UK to take advantage of cheaper labour and operating costs.

 
Could the original Bournville model - a self-contained village for factory workers - be re-envisaged as a more productive architecture to house the 2000 people who are currently detained at any one time?
Based on a reading of Roald Dahl's children's book, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and its conduct towards the factory's own migrant workers - the oompa-loompas - the project examines our current attitude towards immigration through a narrative of absurd spaces within the building. Situated in a public park where visitors can enjoy and experience the excess of all things chocolate, I explore the juxtaposition of spaces of imprisonment within the factory and the free-movement of goods.

 
The notions of brand and national identity and perception of values, embedded in a product as innocuous as a chocolate bar, are also explored through manipulating the thresholds of public awareness of the presence of the work-force of asylum seekers.