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Shortly after joining Precedent as a wide-eyed enthused junior I was striving to get onto my first project. It was a cold winters morning when Tr… Read More
Shortly after joining Precedent as a wide-eyed enthused junior I was striving to get onto my first project. It was a cold winters morning when Trevor 'T-Bone' Chambers approached me and said the words "Luke, do you want to be famous?". Whilst these words may have been a vast over statement, it was exactly what I wanted hear, my journey had begun of working on one of the most highly regarded events in the digital calendar year. It was left to me and a fellow junior under strong creative-direction from designers and directors at Precedent to take the reigns and steer the mighty centaur that was Digital Podge 2011 into fruition. The theme was Digital Olympics, although, without saying or referring to the Olympics. A return to the origins of the games was decided as the concept, a clever juxtaposition of the new age digital era and the classical greek mythology that came along with the events many years ago. Creating a logo mark, website and print collateral that all used the idea of a digital games as a concept we started working through ideas on how it could all come together. Trying examples of pixel art and ceremony ribbons we eventually found the best way to visually show the idea was a simple yet elegant solution of classic figures and statues mixed with a clean vector style illustration. This can also be seen in the logo mark as the classic laurel merges into a digital equivalent. Maybe the best way to sum up Digital Podge MMXI is by using the words from the man himself (which I have kindly butchered and edited down, taken from the Podge website) "The design version of podge lunch started in 1994 but its digital counterpart hit the ground running (a theme of the 2011 lunch)... ...The raison d'être for podge has not changed since its inception in 1994, the aim is to bring together leaders in the field to enjoy a long afternoon chatting to people at the same level who have the same issues as they do and to share war stories and plan for the coming year with new ideas. Many collaborations have come out of the annual lunch not to mention two weddings and three babies (none of them called podge). No speakers, no raffles, no auctions and above all FUN." - Phil Jones www.digitalpodge.co.uk/2011/ Read Less
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