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Being colour blind I have always found a fascination in these test cards. People always look amazed when I say I can't see the numbers. So, it wa… Read More
Being colour blind I have always found a fascination in these test cards. People always look amazed when I say I can't see the numbers. So, it was only obvious that I tried to set a piece in place that represented my disability in a creative way. The first creature that popped into my head was the chameleon. Known for it's ability to change skin pigments to blend with surrounding colours, it was the ideal choice. The card, I have been told doesn't hold a number, but is in fact plate 22 of the series of colour blind test card. Twenty-two being my birthday! Read Less
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Being colour blind is a disadvantage and a disability. However, surprising to most, after I proclaim the fact, it rarely affects my ability to be an artist. I remember the days at school and going to see the nurse to have the mandatory test done. On getting the results being confirmed; of being ‘red-green’ colour blind, I was then informed that I would never be able to be an air force pilot. Luckily for me, this had never crossed my mind, and I always remember those moments of relief walking away from the nurses office.
 
Many years later, I was scanning the internet again, for images, and came across the circular shapes that made up the tests. For some reason, I always spend time staring, hoping that the number would appear, like it was an optical illusion or something. This moment however, sparked a design I did for another matter, related to greying the dotes out to make a t-shirt design for anti-racism. Going through my artwork one day, it struck me again that these dots could be a starter for an image for the series.
 
Whilst thinking about these colour circles I also had in mind to want to use them in a illustration; but what creature? Then one day it dawned on me. This was about the way colours changed the way we see things. Chameleons do the opposite in a way, they see things and then change their colours. I thought to myself, what would be the best ironic situation for a chameleon. Being given a colour blind test and not seeing it, but naturally reacting to it. Can you believe I worked on this image for a full 5 months on and off, as it was tiring doing all the scales on the body.
 
All images are now protected with Digimarc Guardian technology | copyright © Rob Snow 2011 - 2015
 
If you'd like to buy the first book, you can see it here: http://www.blurb.com/b/3164942-animal-behaviour
If you'd like to see the process of how these drawings are done, you can view it here: http://www.behance.net/gallery/Animal-Behaviour-II-movie/3267731
The rendering sketch done for the chameleon image.