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Author's Touch deconstructs the work of Duchenne du Boulogne, who pursued his research on idealized emotions with the positivist belief of Photog… Read More
Author's Touch deconstructs the work of Duchenne du Boulogne, who pursued his research on idealized emotions with the positivist belief of Photography as truthful mirror of the Real. Read Less
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 Author's Touch
Author's Touch deconstructs the work of Duchenne du Boulogne, who pursued his research on idealized emotions with the positivist belief of Photography as truthful mirror of the Real.
Later his plates would be used by Sir Charles Darwin to illustrate his work The Expression of Emotions in Men and Animals.
"The mouth is commonly compressed, and there is almost always a frown on the brow."
Charles Darwin, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals
"Devotion is chiefly expressed by the face being directed towards the heavens, with the eyeballs upturned."
Charles Darwin, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals
"The angle of the corner of the mouth is drawn a little backwards, and at the same time a muscle which runs parallel to and near the nose draws up the outer part of the upper lip, and exposes the canine on this side of the face."
Charles Darwin, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals
"Fear is often preceded by astonishment, and is so far akin to it, that both lead to the senses of sight and hearing being instantly aroused. In both cases the eyes and mouth are widely opened, and the eyebrows raised."
Charles Darwin, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals
"A man in high spirits, though he may actually not smile, commonly exhibits some tendency to the retraction of the corners of the mouth. [...] The frontal muscle tends to contract slightly; and this smooths the brow, removes every trace of a frown, arches the eyebrows a little, and raises the eyelids."
Charles Darwin, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals
"The eyes become dull and lack expression [...], the eyebrows not rarely are rendered oblique, which is due to their inner ends being raised. [...] The corners of the mouth are drawn downwards."
Charles Darwin, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals