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Worldwide 287,000 mothers die each year. Over the timespan of the Australian Poster Biennale, that’s more than 500,000 mothers. The majority of t… Read More
Worldwide 287,000 mothers die each year. Over the timespan of the Australian Poster Biennale, that’s more than 500,000 mothers. The majority of these deaths happen in the developing world and happen because of inequalities in the standards and conditions of women’s lives. Improvements to reduce maternal deaths, and maternal health in general, can be made if all women were educated, families could earn fair and adequate incomes, communities had access to clean, safe water, access to healthy food, stable living conditions, reasonable standards of hygiene and easy access to basic health services. The good news is there have been improvements. The United Nations Millennium Development Goals, in particular Millennium Development Goal No.5, are focused on improving standards and conditions for mothers and women. Maternal deaths are falling. 287,000 mothers died in 2010. Though an alarming figure it is 47 per cent fewer than in 1990. More women are receiving the health services they need. In 2009, 65 per cent of child births were attended by a skilled health worker. Despite improvements, more can be done to redress inequalities. Women in developing countries are 15 times more likely to die of pregnancy-related causes. Ending poverty and stripping away discrimination are key to improving maternal health. Even in developed nations, women who face discrimination are more likely to die of pregnancy-related causes. These are issues closer to home than we’d like to imagine. The three repeated words "MOTHER", divided from commas as in a phrase or period, represent the three stages of an on-going improvement in maternal health: past, present and (we hope) future! The first "MOTHER" word reflect a stage in the PAST when more than 500,000 mothers died every year.The majority of these deaths happened and happen in the developing world because of inequalities in the standards and conditions of women’s lives. The second word is the PRESENT stage: maternal deaths number is falling: 287,000 mothers died in 2010. The good news is there have been improvements, but more can be done to finally have a meaningful improvement in the situation. The colour of this word is a middle step (and come from their bleeding) between the first and the third one "MOTHER" colour. The last "MOTHER" wants to be an hope word. A little movement of a part of the "T" of the word is the border between life and death. If we keep on fighting the issue in the right way, in the future we will say stop to frequent maternal deaths and we will finally say more often the word MOTHER as it must be! Read Less
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