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ICT4S 2020 Art 1
Transforming Mindsets - Art Exhibition of ICT4S and ACM Limits 2020

A photo essay by Peter Brooks following the Red Rebel Brigade as they seek to transform mindsets in relation to the Climate Emergency.
Text and Images copyright Peter Brooks.  Reproduced here with permission.

“You’re channeling love. You’re open to everything. Most of all I was just thinking that I loved every single protester, every single person *wells up* sorry, it’s emotional.”
“There’s something incredibly powerful, especially in volatile, chaotic, high-tension protest situations, about inviting people to slow down. Inviting them to connect with their hearts, to give them permission to feel, to call them back to love.”
“When we face off with the police, we are protecting the rebels. We are showing our rage, our love, our pain and our sorrow.  We humanise the officers, break them, and then flood them with our love.”
I am always asked what their colour means; it’s only a small part of the act. This series should help you see past the red velvet and feel their emotion - this is an extension of their performance.
To learn more about the Red Rebel Brigade and see more images, read Peter Brooks coverage of the group for Huck Magazine here: https://www.huckmag.com/perspectives/reportage-2/a-day-on-the-streets-with-xrs-red-rebel-brigade/

Images from this series have been published in national newspapers and shortlisted in international photography awards. For more visit: @ptrbrks
Etiquette:
Jubilee Line, London Underground.
“I tell you what’s interesting after I left here today, after everyone staring at you and taking a photograph and just putting on normal clothes: suddenly going on the tube and being invisible. That was a very odd feeling.”
In conversation with a Red Rebel.
Image shortlisted in the Sony World Photography Awards, 2020.​​​​​​​
Palace of Westminster, London.
Is there anything that stands out from today?
“Yeah, just the wonderful strength of all the people who are committed to this, who are coming together, the organisation. That the police are being tougher with us, but you can tell by the looks in their eyes that not all their hearts are in it. You can see that they’ve got blood pumping through their veins too. They know we’re doing this for the good of the whole. We just have to keep pushing and pushing because the government, even though they’ve admitted there’s a climate crisis, are not acting. We just need action. We’re providing action so they will act.”
In conversation with a Red Rebel.
Palace of Westminster, London.
“I think the police have used a lot of scare tactics because we’re the ‘softer end’ of society. We’re perceived as kind of middle-class hippies. They don’t realise just how tough most of the people there are, and how passionate and deeply concerned they are. We’re aware of what’s going on, and have been for many decades.”
In conversation with a Red Rebel.
Trafalgar Square, London.
“You’re channeling love. You’re open to everything. Most of all I was just thinking that I loved every single protester, every single person *wells up* sorry, it’s emotional.”
“Every single person is out there, in the rain, risking their liberty … I feel very privileged to be part of this process of trying to get the government to tell the truth about climate change. It’s a wonderful feeling to be able to provide the shift in consciousness a little bit by being so slow. Everything calms down when you arrive. The police are put on the back foot and it shifts things away from the normal shouty protesting and emphasises why we’re doing this. We’re doing this out of love.”
In conversation with a Red Rebel
Commitment:
Westminster, London.
“There is often this moment when people chuckle, laugh or say what the ****. Then they catch your eye, and their breath gets stolen just for a moment. They see us, they really see us. They share that emotion with you and then, with a slow blink they are lost and left to wander on their own again.
For that moment they are part of the Reds too. I’ve seen people stare right into me then have a tear roll down their cheek. An air of not understanding everything yet being entranced. It’s really strange to carry all that eye contact with strangers, but I love that connection.”
In conversation with the Red Rebel pictured.
BBC Broadcasting House, London.
“When we face off with the police, we are protecting the rebels. We are showing our rage, our love, our pain and our sorrow. We humanise the officers, break them, and then flood them with our love. We are emotion embodied; we move as one. We are one. It has given me such purpose and a place to put my love, a place to put my anger and my rage.”
In conversation with a Red Rebel.
St James’ Park, London.
“Well, it’s just very empowering really, and it’s easy to feel disempowered in this world, and this society. Someone just told me it’s the most profound experience of their life. Yeah, taking it to the streets and doing something so beautiful and meaningful, is quite energizing and empowering, and you feel like you’re making an impact. You make an emotive impact on the people that see it. Even on the police *chuckles* they all look really awkward! It’s a beautiful thing!”
In conversation with a Red Rebel.
Trafalgar Square, London.
“I always feel very peaceful, like super peaceful and sort of quiet. Probably the most peaceful and quiet I feel in life, in general. You know what you’re doing and you’re counteracting the environment you’re in. You’re the juxtaposition.”
Makes you feel like you’re doing something. Does it make you hopeful?
“Well I’m pretty hopeful anyway. *Laughs* I guess it sort of makes you think that change is possible from the reaction it creates, I suppose, and the way people respond to it. You get a lot of empathy and a lot of, you know, good energy exchange around it.”
In conversation with a Red Rebel.
BBC Broadcasting House, London.
“I really loved, *clears throat* I really loved the connections with all the people as we were moving around. *clears throat* and the members of the public come up. And there was sort of an anonymity, so it was almost like I was wearing a mask, and I could go from just being really personal and walking along and then, at any moment I chose, just to sort of come out of it and look at somebody. And connect. And people started crying and then I started crying.”
In conversation with a Red Rebel.
Image shortlisted and published in the British Journal of Photography, Portrait of Humanity Award, 2020.
Steps of St Martin-in-the-Fields. Trafalgar Square, London.
“There's something incredibly powerful, especially in volatile, chaotic, high-tension protest situations, about inviting people to slow down. Inviting them to connect with their hearts, to give them permission to feel, to call them back to love. Performing with the Red Rebels, there is a beautiful forgetting of the self. A melting into each other and a grounding into our deep, and often forgotten, interconnectedness with all that's around us. All the life on this planet that has been lost and which continues but under grave threat.”
In conversation with the Red Rebel pictured.
Debenhams:
Debenhams department store, Oxford Street, London.
“It fluctuates, the feeling definitely fluctuates. Sometimes you see people, they have this grin of like ‘ah this beautiful’ and then you transmit a warm feeling, kind of like love to them and engage with them – well I try. But there’s a few people who are like *angry voice* ‘what the **** is this’ or you know, “I don’t understand!”.
In conversation with a Red Rebel.
ICT4S 2020 Art 1
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ICT4S 2020 Art 1

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