About After the Quake
After the Quakeは日本と核の関係性、それによって見えてくるアメリカの占領に根ざしたポストコロニアル状況に関してのペインティングシリーズ。
After the Quake is a painting series depicting Japan's postwar relationship with nuclear power and its postcolonial state as a result of America's occupation. Each work in this series addresses a historical turning point, such as the 1945 atomic bombings, Japan's use of nuclear power plants as part of the Atoms for Peace project, and the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011.
Seven of the paintings feature figurative images of children expressing social powerlessness and the infantilized political state of postwar Japan as a result of its deep subordination to America following the defeat of World War II and seven years of American military occupation. The use of images of American and Japanese flags indicates a significant political presence of America centered on establishing postwar Japan. Images of waves represent the unexpected natural disaster tsunami that caused the Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011. Tsunami inadvertently awoke public fear and ended an optimistic reliance on the safety of nuclear power, which was fostered by postwar Japan's peaceful and economically stable society, even though the peace was a byproduct of America's nuclear deterrence during the Cold War. In the paintings, I incorporated elements of Pop art such as manga speech balloons, vibrant colors, and flatness with contours and few shades. It is a symbol of Japan's economic Americanization and the dominance of mass cultures in postwar society, and it refers to the fact that "pop" culture numbed Japan's public sense of crisis toward nuclear violence.​​​​​​​
Photo by Miri Lin, Courtesy of Souya Handa Projects

Photo by Miri Lin, Courtesy of Souya Handa Projects


繰り返し押し寄せる波に(The Wave Surging Repeatedly)
2017
162x130cm
acrylic paint on canvas

北斎の怒涛図、Roy Lichtensteinのdrowning girlをベースに、2011年に東日本を襲った大津波に関して描いた作品。中心の子供は津波に対しての無力さを象徴している。吹き出し内の"the tide"から始まる英文はWilliam Butler Yeatsのthe second comingの序文を元にしている。

This painting is about Japan’s public powerlessness caused by 2011 great earthquake and tsunami hit the east side of Japan. Unceasing aftershocks and tsunami caused a massive destruction in the northeastern coastal cities of Japan and a nuclear accident of the Fukushima power plant. The Japanese government also failed to act efficiently and took late emergency measures to aid the victims, leading to an increased death and injury toll as well as the unsolved issues regarding the effects of nuclear radiation. This further dampened the hopes of the the Japanese public. The image of a child face is a representation of Japanese people swallowed by tsunami and people victimized by the Fukushima accident. The waves shown in the work refer to Hokusai Katsushika’s painting called 男浪 meant “male wave”, and the placement of the face and the use of a speech balloon were inspired by the pop art piece, “Drowning girl” by Roy Lichtenstein. The wave is a metaphor of tsunami and its destruction but also indicating an art historical subject matter repeatedly appeared both in the artworks of Japanese and the western. The verse in English in the speech balloon was cited from the poem, The Second Coming, by William Butler Yeats, and the Japanese underneath, which I had written myself, expresses the sudden loss of peacefulness existed right before the disaster.  


原子力のジレンマを解決し(Solve the fearful atomic dilemma)
2018
162x130cm
acrylic paint on canvas

原子力の大量殺戮兵器としての側面と平和利用の矛盾をテーマに制作した。中心の子供は原子力の炎に囚われ逃げられず這いつくばっている。吹き出し内の英文はWilfred Owenのinsensibilityから、和文はアイゼンハワー大統領による核の平和利用の演説より抜粋。

"Solve the fearful atomic dilemma" is a painting work that focuses on the conflict between two aspects of nuclear use: mass destructive weaponry and electric plants as a major example of peaceful benefits. Japan is the only country that experienced two atomic bombings targeting civilians by the US military in 1945, and it also adapted to America's political strategy of spreading nuclear power not as weapons but for peaceful purposes for reasons rooted in the Cold War power game between the 1950s and 1960s. Atomic Energy Basic Law was passed in Japan in 1955 to justify the use of nuclear plants, only two years after President Dwight David Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace speech and ten years after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The urgency of Japan's political adaptation to nuclear power was caused by the country's postwar political and military subordination to America, and the society lacked critical thinking about the destructive effects of nuclear power as a result of government propaganda purifying images of nuclear use. In other words, the Japanese society did not spontaneously accept the introduction of nuclear power plants. A child is lying on the ground in flames in the center of the painting, representing Japan's forced political engagement with nuclear power, from the devastation of atomic bombs to the adoption of Atoms for Peace. The English verse in a speech balloon is from Wilfred Owen's poem Insensibility, which was written about the devastation caused by the use of modern weaponry during World War I, and the Japanese sentences are from a translated speech of Atoms for Peace. The two verses are also contradictory, expressing that nuclear destruction can be forgotten and replaced with peaceful uses through postwar political pressure.


キノコ雲と波(Mushroom Cloud and Wave)
2017
100x80.3cm
acrylic paint on canvas

第二次世界大戦後より続く日本と核の関係性に関する作品。吉原治良の円の作品を引用することにより戦後を暗喩。青地に波、中心にキノコ雲(リトルボーイ)を配置し、津波による原発事故は広島の原爆投下から続く戦後史を想起させることを表現した。

This work explores Japan's social and historical relationship with nuclear power, from the Little Boy atomic bombing in 1945 to the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011. The Fukushima accident was a historically significant incident that revealed destructive aspects of nuclear power that had been long forgotten in Japanese society due to the government's promotion of "clean, safe, and profitable nuclear energy." The 2011 tsunami accidentally caused to spread nuclear radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant, creating evacuation zones in Fukushima prefecture. I used the waves as a metaphor for an unavoidable domestic natural disaster, exposing memories of nuclear violence in Japanese postwar history. The composition of waves in a circle on a red background is an appropriation of the Gutai artwork, Circle, by a Japanese painter, Jiro Yoshihara, to show how the nuclear accident holds the history of nuclear destruction and its relationship with Cold War politics. In the center, a figurative image with a childlike smile represents the first nuclear violence in Japan, Little Boy, an atomic bomb dropped in Hiroshima.


birthday(red)
2017
41x31.8cm
acrylic paint on canvas

原子力を利用した大量殺戮兵器が誕生した瞬間を描写した作品。トリニティ実験での初の原爆投下の写真をベースに描いた。

This is one of two "birthday" paintings that focus on the violence of nuclear use in Japan. The red painting was inspired by a color photograph of the Trinity test, which took place in New Mexico on July 16, 1945 as part of the Manhattan Project. The realistic depiction of an atomic cloud represents the reality of nuclear weaponry's destructive violence, which was brought to Japan almost one month later. The Trinity test was not intended to attack civilians, but rather to test the effectiveness of an atomic bomb as a weapon. I attempted to capture the moment in human history when nuclear power was first used for destruction.


birthday(blue)
2017
41x31.8cm
acrylic paint on canvas

2011年の原発事故当日、福島原発原子力建屋から立ち上る雲を描いた作品。原子力の平和利用の安全神話が打ち砕かれた瞬間は核への不信の時代が始まったのではというコンセプト。

This is one of two "birthday" paintings that focus on the violence of nuclear use in Japan. This blue painting represents the day, March 11th, 2011, when the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident occurred as a result of a massive tsunami hit, and Japan's public trust in nuclear power, such as a "clean," "safe," or "efficient" social image, was betrayed by the reality of a hydrogen explosion from the Daiichi nuclear plant and the ensuing nuclear radiation spread. The painting is based on an image of the explosion that was broadcast on Japanese TV news that day, and it depicts the reality of a destructive outcome.


赤条と日章(red stripes and sunburst)
2018
53x53cm
acrylic paint on canvas

戦後日本を国旗で表現した。
帝国日本を象徴する旭日旗の方々に広がる線が平行に変わり民主主義の概念が輸入されたが、同時にアメリカに様々な権限を奪われる占領状態も根深く残ることを、条旗のストライプを日章旗に組み合わせ表した。

I used images of the Japanese flag and stripes from the American flag to represent postwar Japan. The Rising Sun, the old Japanese flag primarily used by the Japanese imperial military, represented Japan's invasion of the Asian continent and Pacific Ocean countries, as well as Japan's imperial glory until 1945. After WWII, imperialism ended, and America occupied Japan for seven years with the goal of disarming the Japanese military and reestablishing Japan as a new democratic country. The occupation brought a liberal political concept to Japanese society, but it also left a subordinate state of politics to America that lasted even after the occupation ended. The Japanese flag is juxtaposed on American red stripes in the painting, symbolizing the entire shift in Japan's postwar politics. The imperial Rising Sun flag with spreading red stripes is changed into a parallel representation of new democracy and disarmament brought about by American occupation and imported liberty that lacks independence from America.


第二の故郷(the second home)
2018
45.5x53cm
acrylic paint on canvas

日本の戦後を生み出したアメリカへの憧れが混じるコンプレックスを抽象的表現で描いた。

"the second home" is an abstract painting that expresses a complicated feeling toward America that many Japanese people share. The postwar Japanese culture and lifestyle were heavily influenced by America. During America's seven-year occupation, Japanese people saw American wealth as a new role model. Increasing poverty and economic instability were caused by widespread devastation in Japanese cities by American military air raids and long-term attrition of Japanese society during World War II, and encountering Americans with their prosperous lifestyles resulted in cultural inferiority and aspiration. The painting features an abstracted image of the American flag, with each color blurred. The expression represents an internal complex and a loss of cultural confidence in the former Japanese culture in postwar society.


赤を覗く(Look into the red)
2017
41x31.8cm
acrylic paint on canvas

核の炎に包まれる子供

This piece is paired with "Look into the Blue." Both paintings depict sufferers or situations involving sufferers from Japanese history. "Look into the Red" depicts a victim of nuclear flames. The central figure is surrounded by an abstract image of fire, which represents victims of atomic bombs and the violence of mass-killing weaponry. 


青を覗く(Look into the blue)
2017
41x31.8cm
acrylic paint on canvas

津波にのまれる子供
This piece is paired with "Look into the Red." The blue abstractions that cover the entire canvas are representations of the 2011 Tohoku great tsunami. Many live-streaming TV news stories about the earthquake showed local victims and cities being swallowed by the waves. Even nearly nine years after the disaster, the drowning image of the news has remained in my mind. The central figure closes its eyes in anticipation of death and drowns in the cold water in March.


even you want it(Postwar is over)
2018
53x45.5cm
acrylic paint on canvas

Postwar is overと波を組み合わせた3枚のシリーズの1作目。
2011年の津波というドメスティックな災害を境に、日本人が信じてきたアメリカ輸入の「戦後」が終わった、というコンセプト。津波に日本車や戦後以降作られた地方都市が流され、原発神話が覆る風景の記憶を元にこのシリーズを着想した。
戦後が終わった(Postwar Is Over)という言葉はジョン・レノンとオノ・ヨーコのWar is overのオマージュ。敗戦以降続くアメリカから輸入された「夢」はもう機能せず、終わったと言いたいが、まだ終わっていないと社会では信奉されている、という意味合いを込めた。

This is the first painting of a “postwar is over” series combining a phrase, “postwar is over” and waves with flat depictions. A whole concept of this series is that the postwar period with deep dependency toward America and reliance of nuclear energy had been ended when the great tsunami hit the Fukushima power plant because the history of importing nuclear energy itself meant the complete subordination toward America’s political requests for their Cold War geographic strategy with nuclear deterrence against communist countries. Use of images of waves is inspired by the scenes broadcasted on TV news on the day of the disaster, which people, Japanese cars and local cities were all swallowed by tsunami waves. The scene of tsunami represented that the myth of the safety of nuclear power was overturned. The phrase, “postwar Is over”, is an homage to a song, “war is over” by John Lennon and Yoko Ono. The phrase is sarcastically showing the contradiction between the reality of the nuclear accident and public desire to believe the safety of nuclear power even after the accident. The dream using nuclear power for efficient energy was imported from America, which was exemplified as the speech of Atoms for Peace, and have lasted for the whole years of the postwar period. The dream has come to the end when the nuclear accident occurred, however the end of the dream is not believed in the Japanese society, such as the time when "was is over" was sung while the Vietnam war was still continuing.  


because you want it(Postwar is over)
2018
53x45.5cm
acrylic paint on canvas

Postwar is overと波を組み合わせた3枚のシリーズの2作目。
2011年の津波というドメスティックな災害を境に、日本人が信じてきたアメリカ輸入の「戦後」が終わった、というコンセプト。津波に日本車や戦後以降作られた地方都市が流され、原発神話が覆る風景の記憶を元にこのシリーズを着想した。
戦後が終わった(Postwar Is Over)という言葉はジョン・レノンとオノ・ヨーコのWar is overのオマージュ。敗戦以降続くアメリカから輸入された「夢」はもう機能せず、終わったと言いたいが、まだ終わっていないと社会では信奉されている、という意味合いを込めた。

This is the second painting of a “postwar is over” series combining a phrase, “postwar is over” and waves with flat depictions. A whole concept of this series is that the postwar period with deep dependency toward America and reliance of nuclear energy had been ended when the great tsunami hit the Fukushima power plant because the history of importing nuclear energy itself meant the complete subordination toward America’s political requests for their Cold War geographic strategy with nuclear deterrence against communist countries. Use of images of waves is inspired by the scenes broadcasted on TV news on the day of the disaster, which people, Japanese cars and local cities were all swallowed by tsunami waves. The scene of tsunami represented that the myth of the safety of nuclear power was overturned. The phrase, “postwar Is over”, is an homage to a song, “war is over” by John Lennon and Yoko Ono. The phrase is sarcastically showing the contradiction between the reality of the nuclear accident and public desire to believe the safety of nuclear power even after the accident. The dream using nuclear power for efficient energy was imported from America, which was exemplified as the speech of Atoms for Peace, and have lasted for the whole years of the postwar period. The dream has come to the end when the nuclear accident occurred, however the end of the dream is not believed in the Japanese society, such as the time when "was is over" was sung while the Vietnam war was still continuing.  


therefore I want it(Postwar is over)
2019
53x45.5cm
acrylic paint on canvas

Postwar is overと波を組み合わせた3枚のシリーズの3作目。
2011年の津波というドメスティックな災害を境に、日本人が信じてきたアメリカ輸入の「戦後」が終わった、というコンセプト。津波に日本車や戦後以降作られた地方都市が流され、原発神話が覆る風景の記憶を元にこのシリーズを着想した。
戦後が終わった(Postwar Is Over)という言葉はジョン・レノンとオノ・ヨーコのWar is overのオマージュ。敗戦以降続くアメリカから輸入された「夢」はもう機能せず、終わったと言いたいが、まだ終わっていないと社会では信奉されている、という意味合いを込めた。

This is the third painting of a “postwar is over” series combining a phrase, “postwar is over” and waves with flat depictions. A whole concept of this series is that the postwar period with deep dependency toward America and reliance of nuclear energy had been ended when the great tsunami hit the Fukushima power plant because the history of importing nuclear energy itself meant the complete subordination toward America’s political requests for their Cold War geographic strategy with nuclear deterrence against communist countries. Use of images of waves is inspired by the scenes broadcasted on TV news on the day of the disaster, which people, Japanese cars and local cities were all swallowed by tsunami waves. The scene of tsunami represented that the myth of the safety of nuclear power was overturned. The phrase, “postwar Is over”, is an homage to a song, “war is over” by John Lennon and Yoko Ono. The phrase is sarcastically showing the contradiction between the reality of the nuclear accident and public desire to believe the safety of nuclear power even after the accident. The dream using nuclear power for efficient energy was imported from America, which was exemplified as the speech of Atoms for Peace, and have lasted for the whole years of the postwar period. The dream has come to the end when the nuclear accident occurred, however the end of the dream is not believed in the Japanese society, such as the time when "was is over" was sung while the Vietnam war was still continuing.  


I don't care, I'd rather sink
2019
53x45.5cm
acrylic paint on canvas

Roy Lichtensteinのdrowning girlの構図を引用し、溺れる子供を描いた。波にのまれつつも眠っているかのように表現した。

I depicted a drowned child with a composition inspired by a painting, “Drowning girl” by Roy Lichtenstein. The child in the image is expressed asleep in peace while the child is swallowed by tsunami. 


ロスアラモスの女の子(A girl in Los Alamos)
2019
30x30cm
acrylic paint on canvas

原爆開発者を曽祖父母に持つ友人アメリカ人との会話に着想を得た。私の母方の曽祖父、親戚の何人かは広島市内で1945年に被爆しているが、アメリカの白人の友人はそれを聞いた際に自身の曽祖父母はロスアラモス国立研究所で原爆開発に従事していたことを明かした。原爆開発はアメリカ人の誇りで、原爆投下は平和をもたらしたと言われた。
作品内の人物はロスアラモス国立研究所で母親とショッピングをしている少女の写真の模写で、少女は1940年代に流行った夏用ワンピースを着ている。少女は戦争中の物不足の日本とは対照的な豊かなアメリカを象徴し、同時に背後から覗きワンピースに透けるキノコ雲はアメリカの戦争下の暴力性を暗喩している。

This painting was inspired by a talk with an American friend whose grandparents were scientists who worked on the Manhattan Project. I come from a family where members suffered as a result of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima in 1945. My inspiration for this painting came from my own conflicted emotions when the American friend mentioned both of the tranquility brought about by the bombings and American pride in developing atomic weapons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. A little girl shopping with her mother at the Los Alamos Laboratory is depicted as the painting's focal character, dressed in a summer clothing that was popular in the 1940s. Behind the girl, a mushroom cloud can be seen to represent the brutality of the nuclear weapons.


Glory for peace
2019
100x72.7cm
acrylic paint on canvas

冷戦期に日本に影響を及ぼしたアメリカと核開発に関しての作品。アメリカ国旗の下に1946年のビキニ環礁核実験成功を祝いキノコ雲を模ったケーキに入刀するアメリカ軍人の写真が透けて見えている。日本への原爆投下後も核による政治的緊張は続いており、同時にその核こそが戦後日本の発展の裏にある強固な力であるというコンセプト。


A rain of ruin
2019
22x27.3cm
pastel, collage on canvas board


American flag on a document of Trinity
2019
22x27.3cm
pastel, collage on canvas board


平和の定義(Definition of peace)
2019
22x27.3cm
pastel, collage on canvas board


The latest news
2019
22x27.3cm
pastel, collage on canvas board


8月の子供(A child in August)
2019
22x27.3cm
pastel, collage on canvas board​​​​​​​
After the Quake
Published:

After the Quake

Published: