Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has several websites under its umbrella and were looking to improve the website layouts and architecture. Their problem was many-fold: large amounts of content were not correctly organized, and website design and components were not being used in a way that led to a consistent experience across a number of their sites. 

Sarah Khan Design partnered with two other firms over the course of two years to provide guidance on usability, content, and website architecture for CDC's sites that are aimed at public health officials.

A few things that we did:
1. Audited all affected sites from a content perspective to determine where improvements  could be made to the content architecture, content prioritization based on metrics, and most importantly, to figure out how we could standardize layouts based on page types.
2. Created wireframes and a style guide using existing components, to explain and instruct the government on the purpose of the different content modules, how to use them on the website, and what modules tend to be more usable (and should be used more often) than others. Modules in this case could be tab boxes for example, or a hero image with feature text. Basically, elements on a page that need to be used in the right way, in order to create best practice web design. Example below.

3. Provided page-by-page recommendations to show how the government could go about improving the content and using correct modules on these websites, with special attention on the audience that the website is for.

The result was being able to guide the government on best practices for web content and website design and giving them a solid framework to help their content specialists make more informed decisions when creating and managing content and web layout.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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