How Can You Be Alive You Growths of Spring?
134
3
0
Published:
  • Add to Collection
  • About

    About

    My thesis project for my masters of fine arts at the School of Visual Arts, How Can You Be Alive You Growths of Spring? addresses ideas of regene… Read More
    My thesis project for my masters of fine arts at the School of Visual Arts, How Can You Be Alive You Growths of Spring? addresses ideas of regenerative cycles of life and death. This work stems from a fascination with the complexities of biology and wonder at the improbability of life generating and regenerating itself in endless cycles. Using photography and video I document real and staged processes such as decaying vegetation turning to compost or plants growing from unlikely sources. My work tows the line of attraction and repulsion by showing things such as death, decay, and bodily refuse in an aesthetically appealing way. I am also addressing the relation of seemingly contradictory forces. Decay begets new growth, birth begets death and death begets rebirth. The cycle is terrifying, repulsive and amazing all at once. It is my hope that this work fills the viewer with a sense of wonder at the incredible regenerative nature of life and stimulates deeper contemplation of both life and death on a larger scale as part of an endless, cosmic cycle. Read Less
    Published:
Homo/Humus details a microcosm of the life cycle by showing compost in various stages of decay and renewal. The first stage is the set up of a compost bin containing worms, rotting food scraps, paper and dead leaves. Eventually the organic material is consumed by the worms and turned into nutrient-rich compost. Next, I add actual parts of my body to the heap in the form of sloughed-off skin, fingernails and hair. The worms then consume this matter too and a plant is grown out of the resulting compost/dirt, bringing the cycle to a new beginning. The title, Homo/Humus, points to the fact that the Latin words for human and dirt are etymologically related as are the physical components of both. This piece was inspired, in part, by Helen Chadwick’s Carcass, an installation consisting of an enormous, clear container full of compost. In her own words “What better metaphor for life, than life itself?” Homo/Humus adds another dimension to ordinary compost by incorporating physical elements of the human body, simultaneously a modern-day Vanitas and a hopeful reminder of the eternity of life.