The Girl and the Cathedral - Bushel&Peck Books
I saw that the flower to which she pointed did not seem to be a flower at all. It was a grand building, the tallest of the garden that was called Paris. And it was a wondrous edifice. It seemed to bring heaven down to the island.

“How can you call this a flower,” I wondered. “This is a building. It has doors and stone and a wood roof, with a vaulted ceiling and statues and gargoyles and carvings and paintings throughout. The people pass in and out. People cannot go in and out of flowers, and flowers cannot be made of stone.”

“Flowers cannot be made of stone?” The little girl turned to me, incredulous. “Of course flowers can be made of stone! Look how beautifully she has grown in the soil of history and legend. Look how the sunlight feeds the colors of her Rose Window. Look how the moonlight falls across her bell towers, flowing like rainwater to feed my thirsty flower. Some of the best flowers are made of stone.”

I gazed upon the beautiful building and felt it whisper to my soul. “You are right,” I said.
I visited the garden many times, and the little girl was right.

I watched Notre Dame as children played beneath her windows and as the first hot air balloon rose even higher than her towers. Before her doors, I saw that the little girl had planted many unique and wonderful seeds. Science bloomed. Literature blossomed. Theater and Music flowered. Dance waved gracefully in the breeze.

“My garden is more beautiful than ever,” said the little girl. And indeed it was.

But on my next visit, beauty had given way to darkness. A great war besieged the garden called Paris and much of the world. The little girl closed her eyes. “I cannot bear to watch my garden during such a terrible war,” she said as she cried. “It trembles from bombs and from burnings, and the people tremble from fear.”

“Perhaps your greatest flower can watch with you,” I said.

Through the darkness and fire and fighting, Notre Dame watched patiently over the rest of the garden. She listened to the silent prayer of an old woman who pled that her son would return safe from the war. She shone with hope even when the rest of the garden darkened in soot and despair. And her bells sang with joy when, finally, the great war ended.  
Hi all!
I have a wonderful news for you: the kickstarter of the picturebook i am illustrating "The Girl and The Cathedral" is now live!

This is a wonderful story in the spirit of "The Little Prince", about a small girl with an island in the Seine. There, she begins a garden—but not a garden of flowers. It will be a garden of people, she says: Paris.
In the center of her garden, the little girl plants her greatest treasure of all: Notre Dame de Paris.

Written by Nicolas Jeter and will be published by Bushel&Peck Books.

If you like to support the project and want the book to come to life, please make a little pledge or share it :)

The Girl and the Cathedral - Bushel&Peck Books
62
293
8
Published:

The Girl and the Cathedral - Bushel&Peck Books

The Girl and the Cathedral Bushel&Peck Books
62
293
8
Published:

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