Pet Care Beyond What You’re Used To
Pet Care Beyond What You’re Used To
Taking care of your pets is something that you should want to do because you love them and they are your responsibility. Sometimes, giving your dog a bath can seem like a chore. And taking them out at night can also be the last thing you want to do on a cold winter night when you’re feeling under the weather. But because they depend on us in a way that we are literally their caretakers, we do it anyway for them (and sometimes, it’s because we don’t want a mess in the house).
Part of their caretaking involves making sure they’re fed, which can be a monthly bill you expect to pay so that they can eat everyday. Other aspects include making sure they are medicated with heartworm and flea medicine. When you start to add it all up and think about it, you’re paying a decent amount in an entire year for your pet to be happy, healthy, and safe.

One thing a lot of people don’t do for their pets, though, is brush their teeth. As much as it seems like a weird practice since animals don’t brush their own teeth, brushing your dog’s teeth can actually be very beneficial for them in the long run in order to keep their canines strong, healthy, and free of rot.

Typically, the teeth you’ll see that has the most tartar on them in your dog is their rear teeth. These are the ones usually darker in color, as they do the most chomping when your dog is eating its food. It’s no wonder that they’re darker from plaque since they have more exposure to food and treats. Just as well, your dog can’t “clean” them as well with their tongue simply because they’re buried at the back of their mouth.
So, the next time you’re in the pet store, look for some dental treats or brushes for your dog. Obviously you won’t be using the exact same type of products you yourself use, but it may be worth spending an extra 10 bucks or so to get some dental gear that will last for a year for your dog. It’s not like you’ll be brushing their teeth every single day. Rather, a good strong cleaning once or twice a week should suffice. After all, it’s more than you were doing previously, right? You wouldn’t want your own teeth to rot after neglect. Do the same for your pet since they can’t do it on their own.
Pet Care Beyond What You’re Used To
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Pet Care Beyond What You’re Used To

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