Wie man dem toten Hasen die Bilder erklärt/ blackboards
This is a series of blackboards pédagogiques in the spirit of Beuys' Free International University for Creativity and Interdisciplinary Research (each one to be available also as a panneau décoratif). 
The tryptique, which appears in the first blackboard, is a restatement of Wesley Duke Lee's "O Tríptico," with the lateral figures (Chefe & Eminência Parda) updated as an homage to UFRGS' so-called "Intituto de Artes." The others are related to Édouard Vuillard, Toulouse-Lautrec, Pissarro, Gauguin & Cézanne. 
All these blackboards have the same title followed by a specific subtitle: 
Wie man dem toten Hasen die Bilder erklärt: 
Triptyque sur le secret onctueux de la déchéance du nabisme
Le voyant de le Scorpion dans les taches
Fin génie de la deformation au corps d'Apollon
Julie Vellay et d'autres disparues rétrouvées 
En attendant la noisette qui tombe
Louis Guillaume immobile évanoui
 
The blackboards are made with pictures I took at the Musée d'Orsay (original works by Vuillard, Maurice Denis & Coubert), the Musée Marmottan Monet (Pissarro), l'Église de Saint Sulpice (Delacroix), the Museo de Arte Precolombino e Indígena (in Montevideo), and also at the Land of the Southern Lapwing. Some of the pictures are taken from books. For more about the diagrams, see "the great abyss inframince" (which I owe also to disinherited but finally emancipated acclaimed professors of Beuys' UCIR, Miss Rosalind Krauss & Miss Beautiful Dalrymple Handsome). 
One of the lessons to be learnt from the blackboards is related to Ernst Gombrich's turn-to-bone aphorism: the self-contradictory nature of impressionism (Art & Ilusion). With the caveat that all art has a self-contradictory nature, not least because nature is itself self-contradictory. That is, nature is faraway from being just natural. And this is indeed one of the things causing the masses cerebral indigestion...
About Wesley Duke Lee's "O Tríptico": "Essa parte foi considerada chocante e, para remediar a situação, a Eminência Parda colou a parte móvel com Araldite, numa atitude espantosa de autoritarismo e desrespeito ao artista, que nesse momento se encontrava no exterior... Wesley retorna e transforma o retrato num tríptico, pintando uma tarja negra sobre os olhos da mulher retratada e colocando a cada lado do retrato os guardiões... acopla à tela um retrato do Chefe, com sua moldura dourada, típica do ecletismo... a Eminência Parda é representada de óculos escuros..." Cacilda Teixeira da Costa, Wesley Duke Lee, Edusp 2005, p. 117-18.
The following quotation seems also related and is anyways most useful in the context:  
"The yellow varnish that was spread over paintings in the nineteenth century to give them what was called a 'gallery tone' has disappeared with the Claude glass. We have been taught to look into light without putting on black spectacles... [but alas not everybody learned]" Ernst H. Gombrich, Art and Illusion, Princeton University Press 2000, p. 53.
Wie man dem toten Hasen die Bilder erklärt/ blackboards
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Wie man dem toten Hasen die Bilder erklärt/ blackboards

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