Mind Meteorology
'Mind Meteorology' visually compares fascinating meteorological patterns with patterns of cognitive psychology, exploring the notion that both nature and the human mind can be reflective of one another.

This series of illustrations aims to examine points of connection between humans and nature. While our planet is composed of an atmosphere with behaviours and resulting climates – so are our minds. Looking slightly inward offers a plethora of psychological patterns that are common between humans, and yet, like the weather, ever-changing. Our cognitive processes can be spoken about, but are not seen in physicality, thus making them hard to explain. As such, these illustrations draw connections to meteorological phenomena that are also more unique and rarely viewable, to heighten this overall fascinating quality between these two concepts and give them a visual existence.

All primary and final stages of the work were solely completed digitally on Adobe Photoshop and for the purpose of a fourth-year thesis project. This allowed for a simpler process of revisions and editing as every facet of the project existed in a digital form already. Constraints established by our instructors revolved around creating a unique pitch that communicated an “idea” rather than just a “topic”. Reference photographs of the actual phenomena were utilized during the course of the project as well but have been omitted due to lack of ownership; however, these amazing weather patterns can definitely be found online, so take a look!
These pieces were paired in a display with an accompanying book that talked about the science behind these odd, yet interesting meteorological phenomena. The book was rendered in a different style to serve as a support but not take away, using the same textured painting aesthetic to maintain some consistency.

Below is each piece in a larger form with its accompanying description regarding the psychological + weather synthesis, and the corresponding book spread.
Frost Flowers: The desire to preserve childhood innocence lends itself to a sense of fragility that is similar to the delicate and impermanent nature of ice-based “frost flowers”.
Ice Circles: The repetitive motion of perfectly rotating “ice circles” evokes the eerie sense of recurrence found in déjà vu moments.
Non-aqueous Rain: An onslaught of different ideas during brainstorming can make choosing a particular idea difficult, similar to trying to catch something during “non-aqueous rain” – the raining of flightless animals.

Haze: The meteorological phenomenon of “haze” is comparable to having a lack of self-identity or identity confusion, and fading into the background.
Snow Rollers: Unique solutions are harder to generate and see through than clichés or repeated ones, whereas uniform “snow rollers” can gain momentum quickly thanks to the wind.
Lenticular Clouds: “Lenticular clouds” assume a layered appearance that resembles the taking apart of one’s self for the purpose of sometimes harsh self-assessment.
Auroras: Ignorance and distractions are often modes of coping with unpleasant situations and “auroras” can be neon fabrics that can veil the darkness in such instances.
Fire Whirls: Inner turmoil can be overwhelming and self-destructive – much like “fire whirls”; tall towers of flame sprouting upwards from wildfires.
PROCESS: Early Sketches, Refined Concepts, Colour Roughs

My visual imagery was sometimes inspired by a "scientific illustration", "diagrammatic", or "textbook" aesthetic in terms of layout or symbols, in order to create a visual language that was representative of the explored scientific themes.
For my 2019 graduation exhibition at OCAD University, I displayed this body of work as my 'final thesis' for my Illustration Program. I designed the title on Adobe Illustrator to be laser-cut onto wood, and displayed my book on the left beside the framed illustrations.
Mind Meteorology
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Mind Meteorology

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