The Disability Awareness Movement
The Disability Awareness Movement
An Awareness campaign for the disabled, winner of the prestigious Sappi Ideas that Matter award and a Loerie Awards finalist.
This campaign was developed for The Summerstrand Cheshire Home in association with Pick 'n Pay and was funded by the Sappi Ideas That Matter initiative. This campaign won a grant in the 2009 Sappi Ideas That Matter Initiative and was a finalist in the 2010 Loerie Awards.
voicing their feelings and needs to a society which often does not listen. The campaign forces people to see the disabled and insists that they think about disabled people rather than simply avoiding them. with very different uses, but which are strikingly similar. Trolleys can be compared with wheelchairs in the way which they are pushed, their size and how difficult and irritating they can be to use. Healthy people often take these things for granted. Shopping with a trolley or even pushing one can be annoying, but many South Africans and people around the world have to live with one all day, every day. People with serious physical disabilities and mental weaknesses have to put up with wheelchairs, which are similar to trolleys, all the time, for years.

an impact on them not only to donate, but appreciate their lives more and not take simple acts, like shopping, for granted. The target group for the campaign are consumers from the age of 28 to 60. This campaign is to promote the Summerstrand Cheshire Home


silhouettes in wheelchairs. There are different variations of people in the wheelchairs to indicate that anyone can be in their predicament, regardless of gender, race or age. These images suggest that while the customer is
The text which appears on all the trolleys is intended to be thought provoking and to convey the comparison and similarities of the trolley and wheelchair even further. signage, while others only carry messages on the front and on the inside. These trolleys will appeal to customers who are looking to elude the prominent advertising found on the other trolleys. These few will carry a stern message about trying to avoid the disabled on the inside which faces the customer as they push the trolley. This message is intended to play on the customer’s 


store. The outsides of the baskets are left advertising free, to allow for easy stacking. The only signage on the basket is on the inside, at the bottom. This faces the customer as they look into their basket, creating a more personal
phrases used in the baskets make the public aware of how simple tasks, 


persuasion from their trolley or basket, customers can donate to the Cheshire Home in the form of a voucher which is available at any till point in the store. This is a quick and easy method of donating, the till clerk just needs to run the voucher under the scanner for the customer to donate ten Rand. The voucher has been designed in such a way that it is not only a method of donating, but also a way for the public to take part in the Disability Awareness Movement. This is achieved through the use of stickers. These stickers can be found on the voucher which depict various design elements from the campaign including the Disability Awareness Movement’s logo and many Cheshire Home logos. Customers are encouraged to paste the stickers in areas that are visible to the public where disabled people might have difficulties such as, if the kettle is on a high shelf at work, paste a sticker on it to make others aware that disabled people might struggle to make themselves some coffee. 
The Disability Awareness Movement
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The Disability Awareness Movement

An awareness campaign for the disabled.
22
1,065
0
Published:

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