Fatal Cancer Rates Continue to Fall Among Minorities
Keefe Gorman, CFP, an experienced investment professional and wealth management advisor, is the founder of The Gorman Group at Merrill Lynch. Beyond his investment work with clients at Merrill Lynch, Keefe Gorman engages with a number of philanthropic organizations, including the American Cancer Society (ACS).

The ACS actively promotes cancer awareness and education throughout the United States, including information regarding cancer statistics among minorities. Research, for example, has indicated that the gap in cancer death rates between black and white individuals has narrowed in recent years. In 1990, a black man was 47 percent more likely to receive a fatal cancer diagnosis than a white male with the same condition, compared to a 19 percent disparity in 2016. The gap fell from 19 to 13 percent among women over the same period.

Similarly, overall cancer death rates decreased by 2.6 percent for black men and women between 2006 and 2016, compared to about 1.5 percent for white men and women. The figures indicate considerable progress in recent decades toward equitable medical care and access. Despite this progress, more work must be done, particularly in the role socioeconomic status plays in equitable medical support.
Fatal Cancer Rates Continue to Fall Among Minorities
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Fatal Cancer Rates Continue to Fall Among Minorities

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