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Pop culture profoundly influences the identities of not only its consumers, but also its real world referents. The curate’s egg that is globalis… Read More
Pop culture profoundly influences the identities of not only its consumers, but also its real world referents. The curate’s egg that is globalisation has scattered a billion Brooklyns, Bronxes and Manhattans around the world. Each one is selectively shot, sung or drawn with an agenda. When the world sees Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks finally meet at the top of the Empire State Building with Manhattan spread out before them like a celestial banquet, the city becomes as synonymous with romance as Belle Époque Paris; when Kong climbs the same building to meet his tragic fate, the city becomes a jungle in which the astounding and the unique are forever doomed to be reduced to bloody spectacle; when Patrick Bateman wends his sanguinary way through the antiseptic warrens of Wall Street, the city becomes an icy skullscape where weakness is punishable by death. With the exhibition ‘The Popular Face of New York’, I present an outsider’s perspective on a city. For me, this is Scorsese’s city – an abyss of vice, drugs and crime which echoes with the sound of ricocheting bullets; it is Woody Allen’s city of introspection, ennui and sexual paranoia; it is the only city in the world strong enough to survive a million celluloid obliterations; it is a postmodern diorama in which Top Cat and Vito Corleone can coexist on the same block. Read Less
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