Product Packaging
By Josie Morris
PROJECT BRIEF
In order to learn about the principles of designing in three-dimensions, I built a package to protect a product for 3 different audiences, for kids, college students and 55+.    

INITIAL APPROACH
To start I had to create a context that allowed me design a different package for each of the audiences. I had to tell visually appropriate and compelling stories on three-dimensional forms while conducting empathic studies and visual analysis to develop a deeper understanding of given subject matter and audience.  

PROJECT GOALS
My goals with this project were to better understand the power of design principles within a three-dimensional form and the impact of seemingly insignificant things like color, line quality, shape quality etc. I focused on applying appropriate principles of good typography on 3D structures while striving to enhance my prototyping skills as I built mock-ups and physical forms. 

PROJECT SPECIFICATIONS
I was given the requirements of building three physical package mock-ups. I am required to build each of the final design solutions. Although I was only required to decorate the outside of the packages, I went above to make it seem as though it were a legitimate package by designing the inside as well.

TOPIC RESEARCH
Defining the audience was one of the most important things I could do for this project. I think that by defining the audience, I was better able to understand who I was designing for and what group I was trying to reach.
PACKAGING APPEALS
Through research I was able to narrow down the packaging appeals for the different age groups, finding what packaging works well for the certain ages.
TRENDS AND VISUAL APPEAL
Once again I researched what trends each of these demographics have and what appeals to the visually. 
VISUAL APPEAL AND FONTS & ICON STYLES
I also wanted to get a good feel for what fonts and styles worked well with these demographics. I researched the different ages to find what fonts and styles were more commonly used, and which fonts not to use. 
IDENTIFYING PRINCIPLES
After completing all of my research, I organized the information I had found into different categories. I made sure that in order to create a visually appealing package I needed to be able to create authenticity while targeting visual design through what appeals to those age groups. I determined what made a successful package structure was that it had to be practical and had to protect the product. 

In order to create a successful packaging message I had to create a clear hierarchy of information, making it easy for the readers to understand the information presented. I took into account other elements that make for a successful package by recognizing that I needed to design for shelf content, realizing where my product was going to be sold, and what competition I had around that product so that I could either design a package that is similar to the others, or one that stands out. Taking into account extensibility, I needed to create packages that weren't going to go out of style or become irrelevant. 

I needed my packages to be clear and simple, making sure that the message I was trying to portray was distinct and understandable. I had to create a package that was unique and could be sold because it wasn't the exact same as all the other packages of that product. I had to make sure that my package was truly effective, that the experience that the user was going to have would make them enjoy the product and return for more, all while being playful and catching the eye of the audience. The final thing I was considering was whether or not my package was true to its brand and product, and whether it would feel new and fresh or foreign with my product.  
PAPER MOCKUPS
I created several paper prototypes of my glasses case package to see how different shapes, sizes, and forms worked together to both protect the package and display the product. I built several forms out of paper, user testing them to see which packages were appealing to the different age groups. 
CHIP BOARD PROTOTYPES
After deciding on a form and designing several different cover cases for my packages, I started building chipboard prototypes, testing the flexibility and functionality of the packages. I wanted to make sure that the designs I was using were a good fit for my demographic so I frequently user tested the packages to make sure they were appealing to the right audience. 
DIGITAL DESIGNS
I created several different digital mockups to try and get a feel for what appealed to the demographics I was given. 
MORE DIGITAL MOCKUPS
After getting user testing the designs, I decided to try a few other designs to make the packages more obvious as to what demographic they were designed for. 
FINAL DIGITAL DESIGNS AND PROTOTYPES 
I created my final digital mockups and got critiques on them before taking them to be printed once again to start on the construction of my packages. 
FINAL PRODUCT
FINAL GLASSES CASES
These were my final glasses cases. This project took me very long to complete, from countless digital sketches to numerous prototypes to get the final product. Although it took me a really long time, I learned a lot about product design and designing for an actual package. I learned that we need to take in account the way that we will be manufacturing the product, who will be manufacturing them, and what materials we are going to be using. I learned how important it is to give the folds extra space so when I wrapped them with the prints they could still bend and function.   
KIDS AGES 7-11
This was my final design for the kid audience. 
COLLEGE AGE STUDENTS
This was my final design for the college age audience. 
SENIORS 55+ 
This was my final design for the seniors ages 55+.  

FINAL PACKAGES 
These were my final products from all different angles. 
TAKE AWAY 
While designing packages, I had to be very aware of the targeted audience was that I was trying to reach. If I were to design a package for a dollar store product, it is going to have a very different feel to it than a product design I could be doing for someone like target. 
The package has to represent what the consumer is buying, and if it is a cheap and flimsy package, they are going to assume that the content is going to mirror the package. If the package is made higher quality and looks like there was money put into designing it, I would be trying to reach a wealthier client. 

I learned so much from building these package designs, including the importance of trial and error, coming up with many designs, prototyping, making it realistic, being aware of the 6 p’s (Protect, present, persuade, create or influence perception, provide utility and function, and pallet), providing the correct information and all the legal information, how much space you have to advertise and display your product, working with chip board and papers, finding the correct thickness and weight of the paper, and the correct finish from matte to gloss. All of these things will help me as I apply them to package designing in the future. I am to build and create the best possible experience for the consumer. 
Glasses Cases
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Glasses Cases

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