Earthquakes to Flight Paths: Year 1 at Ito World
I joined Ito World (www.itoworld.com) one year ago to grow and develop the data visualisation service sector of the business. I've had an absolute blast designing cool concepts and innovative new ways to display geo-data in that year. The above show-reel is a culmination of off-cuts and side-projects I've produced during the past year. Some of the more interesting concepts are also shown in the entirety below.
Global Meteorites was a fun little project, I decided to visualise every known meteorite discovery since the early 1500s to modern day. The meteorite size and tail is proportional to its actual weight as it the intensity of the impact noise it makes. The impact noise is full stereo sound meaning the impact noise will either come from the left or right speaker depending on the longitude of the impact. 

The data was derived from NASA and processed by Topi Tjukanov (https://raw.githubusercontent.com/tjukanovt/tjukanovt.github.io/master/data2share/meteorite_clean.csv)

We worked closely with Hyperloop TT developing their vision for a more connected Great Lakes region and one of the visualisation styles to emerge from it was this idea of a 'population density revealing pulse'. As the wave-front propagates it reveals the population density as extruded pillars, the catchment area is a 30 minute drive time, with no congestion, from the centre of Chicago. The full Hyperloop TT Great Lakes Vision is below.
Logistical analysis is tricky and requires some incredibly time consuming processing work. As part of a wider project idea which we tabled for a short while I wanted to visualise how optimising deliveries in an urban area would look. I used logistical routing in ArcGIS to do the heavy lifting with discovering the optimal routes to deliver and then ported these results into our Ito Software to create the eye catching visualisation.
I find flight data fascinating, it's such a great concept to visualise due to the sheer volume and intricacy of the data. I wanted to visualise how aircraft taking off and landing at various airports in Europe helped map the shape of various airports. The below small multiple animation shows a day in the life of each airport with the approach and take off patterns clearly outlining the shape of the airport.
One of the more ambitious projects this year was our entry into the Kantaar Information is Beautiful 2017 awards with our project America's Busiest Bikes. This project should probably warrant it's own post with a detailed breakdown however the video does a good job of explaining the narrative. We analysed open bike-share data from a variety of cities in America and sifted out the busiest bike in each city. We then mapped the journey of that one bike in each city with some innovative 3d mapping and culminated in some summary statistics one of which, the spectra-graph, was particularly interesting, see below for more details.
The above images show some patterns derived from visualising 'all' the open bike-share data fro a city. Each bike journey is mapped by its length, dictated by the time it takes to complete on the y axis. This is spread out throughout a year on the x axis. As trips overlap and accumulate through image blending modes you can start to see patterns. Some of the most obvious are the commuter periods which are broken up by weekends. However if we dig further you can start seeing patterns influenced by weather or other country-wide significant events. 
Every year Ito World tweet a festive infused visualisation, this year I got chance to take the helm and utilising London road network from OpenStreetMap came up with a cool routing based visualisation which spelt out 'Happy Holidays'. The text and graphic were all created using existing road network which I thought was pretty neat. 
Check out the little 'A' in the larger 'A'!
Manchester's Walking Dead was another fun sideline project, we visualised how a Zombie outbreak, originating in Manchester, might propagate the the rest of the UK! For the full fun-down of how we did that including the graphical influences which drove it, check out this post (https://www.behance.net/gallery/70043113/Mapping-A-Zombie-Apocalypse)
Global Earthquakes was one of the first visualisations I produced at Ito World, and I am still super happy with it. The data is fairly straight forward on this one, each ping represents a recorded earth quake with the intensity proportional to the earthquake intensity. I also wanted to show the positions of the tectonic plates along with an almost aurora like light effect emitting from the plate boundaries. As with any globe based visualisation, half of the world is always hidden, we remedied this by introducing a flat map indicating where the earthquakes were originating. There is also a semi-transparency on the globe where the oceans lie which exposes a rendered core, purely for aesthetics!
The London Cycle Hire visualisation was another 'early' project and showed the comparison in cycle hire from a normal to a bank holiday. As I only knew the origin and destination points of the cycle hire data I had to assume the journey in-between. Weight was given to cycle-friendly routes to make it a little more believable. 
I also had a lot of fun with LiDAR data this year and came up with some pretty cool ways of showing it, most of which are in the initial show-reel, however the below is my favourite extract in it's entirety.
Earthquakes to Flight Paths: Year 1 at Ito World
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Earthquakes to Flight Paths: Year 1 at Ito World

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